Archive for May, 2009

31 May 2009

  • Posted by Steve Spencer
  • Utah Martial Arts on Facebook

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    30 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Some Judo at Hidden Valley and Absolute MMA… a bit much for one day.

    This Article is comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here

    breaking-pointToday we hit it double hard on Judo:

    We did 2 hours at Hidden Valley Judo, grabbed some lunch, then did another 3 hours of Judo with Akbar and Bill over at Absolute MMA.

    Then, I headed home to throw up.

    5 hours of Judo was just a bit more than I think my poor body was up for today.

    But the good news is, that once I got over the joy of watching lunch flush down the toilet, and started feeling better, I had a chance to really reflect on what  neat experience it was.  Any of you who have followed this blog for a long period know that Ty (My son) and I attended two Judo classes per night for quite a while.  The experience was really neat.  It is always good to work with different people, all with slightly different skills, and all with different body types.

    Today was no exception.  I want to really thank Bill and Akbar for the excellent teaching.  I also want to that those we worked with, and all that we had a chance to learn from them.  Special thanks also to Kevin and Adam for helping me as I try to understand this whole “exercise induced asthma” thing and what it means for me.

    We will definitely try to sit in on this class more often in the future (although I don’t know that I can convince my family that I should be doing Judo from 9:00 through 3:00 or 4:00 every Saturday.)  I think there is real value in finding a martial art you like, and sticking with it.  I also think there is value to finding a Sensei that you like, and having them help you grow.  But there is also value in adding a dash of new-ness from time to time as well… just to push you out of your comfort zone.

    Thanks again to everyone.  I hope to see a lot more of you.

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    29 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • How you can tell if someone does Judo

    This Article is comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here

    img_0177I woke up this morning with one of the tell-tale signs of Judo.  It’s funny, but it seems I always have bruises on my arms since I took up Judo.  They don’t really hurt, but they can be an interesting conversation starter.

    For those of you who also do Judo, I’m sure you know what I mean.  For anyone who doesn’t let me explain: In Judo, the Gi isn’t just some fancy piece of clothing, or a traditional uniform.  Judo uses clothing a lot for gripping, throwing, and choking people.  Although this is possible without the Gi, you will go through an awful lot of torn shirts in a month.  The Gi is much more durable and tough.

    As you grip the Gi, often times you also get a bit of what’s inside it :)

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    28 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • The latest TUF blog

    This Article is comes from Mixed Martial Arts
    To see the full original article click here

    DaMarques Johnson’s latest post about The Ultimate Fighter just launched. He talks about the big to-do with Michael Bisping. Check it out here.

    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    28 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Rear Naked Choke

    This Article is comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here

    Brazilian Jujitsu and UFC fighter Demian Maia applying the Mata Leo, or rear naked choke.

    It seems like 10-15% of MMA fights end via rear naked choke. At first blush, 15% doesn’t seem like a lot. When looking at the whole picture, however, you realize that there are hundreds of other workable submission techniques, in addition to ending fights with strikes. By comparison, you notice how pervasive the rear naked choke really is.

    It’s frequency in MMA is due to it’s utility – it works against strong opponents, when fighters are sweaty and slippery, it works for guys with short arms or long arms, first round and last round. Because it is a difficult submission to escape, once a guy locks in the choke, most fights end.

    There are several good video tutorials, but this is by far my favorite one on the internet right now. It runs about 10 minutes and covers a lot of details that will make you sharper in this choke.

    Steven Kesting’s Step by Step Rear Naked Choke

    .

    One point in particular – how to tighten the choke and keep it with the palm to palm grip, has really been useful to me while attempting the submission. It’s rare that your opponents neck is stretched out, ready for you to easily put the choke in place. As soon as you threaten the choke, expect that your opponent will divert attention to defend it.  Expect that if you can’t make step by step progress, you’ll probably lose the choke.

    Also, learning to get your leg hooks in is a whole lesson in itself. It’s an area that I’m excited to learn more about.  In a class down at Fusion BJJ, Dayne Aristizabal showed how improper hooking critically destabilized your position, opening yourself up for unhappy endings.

    One last thing. The squeeze. Some guys have killer arm chokes – they latch onto your neck and get tighter and tighter until you tap. I’ve heard that Marcello Garcia is one of those kind of guys, once he gets one arm under you chin its like an anaconda mercilessly sqeezing a guinea pig. No escape.

    Anyway, the power squeeze isn’t something your born with. You have to develop a power squeeze in the same way you sharpen you technique – practice and effort.

    Be careful, and happy choking.

    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    27 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • UFC/WEC won’t come to Utah this year

    This Article is comes from Mixed Martial Arts
    To see the full original article click here

    Just got off the phone with Marc Ratner of the UFC. He confirmed that there’s still interest in Salt Lake City for a UFC or WEC event, but it’s not going to happen this year. He said early next year was looking more likely.He threw out the possibility of a Fight Night, but of course that’s all speculation at this point.By the way, I’ve just started a Twitter feed @SLTribMMA so if you’re into it,

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    27 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Review: Inter Mountain West Regional Judo Championship

    This Article is comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here

    This content was written by Mike Hermosillo (thank much mike!):

    The Inter mountain West Regional Judo Championship was a success.  It was held May 15-16 2009 at Granite High School.  We were all excited to have the 2008 Beijing Olympian Ryan Reser there.

    Ryan held a very high level clinic and also competed in the Black belt division.  It was great to see an Olympic level Judoka compete.

    I was also impressed with the level of Judo that was shown at the tournament. We had competitors who trained other sports and martial arts such as Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and wrestling but opted to use Judo techniques as opposed to using what they felt more comfortable with.

    The womans open division black belt division had to have been my favorite.   The big difference between women and men are when men get competitive they tend to use more streghth.  When woman turn up the competitive spirit they tend to get faster and much more technical.  The following competitors from Hidden Valley Judo and Jiu-Jitsu placed:

    Isabella Hermosillo (Age 4) took 2

    Braden whatcott (age 6) took 3rd

    Alicia Hermosillo (Age 9) Took 1st

    Jon Newman (12) who won by golden Score @ 2:59 of the 3 minute overtime match took 3rd

    Michael Hermosillo (12) Took 2nd in the 11-12 YO division and 2nd in the 13-14 YO division

    In the Adult division Jerry took 1st in the white belt division and 3rd in the Brown Black division.

    Those of you who did not attend this year missed out on a great tournament but unlike other lost oppertunites this one will be back next year.   All in all it was a great compitition.  See you there next year.

    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    26 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • A familiar face at UFC 98

    This Article is comes from Mixed Martial Arts
    To see the full original article click here

    There was plenty of action to keep you busy at UFC 98, but one of the coolest things may have been something you didn’t see.Did you notice DaMarques Johnson come down and help corner Matt Hughes along with Robbie Lawler and Matt Pena? He didn’t get a ton of face time, and certainly that wasn’t the point. Matt Hughes just made DaMarques a better fighter.As a contestant on "The Ultimate Fighter:

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    24 May 2009

  • Posted by Steve Spencer
  • Mixed Martial Arts observation from UFC 98

    UFC 98 was a pretty spectacular bunch of fights.  Odds are you will be, and probably are already hearing a lot about it.

    In particular, the performance by Lyoto Machita was really, really amazing.

    But you’ll hear plenty about that from a lot of other posters.  I want to write about something else I watched that I think was great to learn from:

    Matt Hughes and Matt Serra.  Both of these guys really showed us something spectacular.  If you watched the fight, you might assume that I am going to comment on Serra’s striking.  You would be wrong.

    The thing about Serra that I saw in that fight was the way he would drop instantly into a very aggressive guard.  Each time Hughes dropped Serra to the ground they would land with Serra who, although on bottom, was already advancing his position and threatening Hughes by the time they even landed.  I think we can all learn a lot from that.  The guard can be a place to rest, regroup, gather your wits, and protect yourself.  But we have all seen and done that.  Serra gave us a reminder that the guard can be oh sop much more.  I think that this fact more that anything kept Serra in the fight.

    Hughes was great as well.  What I really like from Hughes is that he showed everyone that there are actually ways to take a person down other than the damned double leg takedown that everyone tries.  I personally practice Judo, but also have great respect for the strong, upper-body throws of Greco Roman wrestling.  It was great to see Hughes using more of these throws than we normally see in an MMA bout (and Serra pulled off a nice one as well.)

    24 May 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Judo and Exercise Induced Asthma

    This Article is comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here

    inhalerI have been doing Judo actively for just over a year and a half now.  Prior to that I did Karate off and on for several years, and long before that I was a wrestler.  I have never had any trouble with my breathing… or so I thought.

    Starting about 9 months ago, a good friend of mine in Judo started commenting on my breathing in Judo.  He mentioned a wheeze in my breathing and told me I had asthma.  Quite frankly, I thought he was off base.  I felt great.  I didn’t feel like there was anything wrong with my breathing.  I disregarded his comments.

    Then, more recently I had another person who was visiting our class comment on my breathing and ask how long I’ve had asthma.  Although I again denied any problem breathing, it struck me that multiple people would say this.  The most recent person stated that I definitely sounded as if I were having a pre-asthmatic episode.

    Just to be sure, I went to the doctor.  The tested my heart, and it looked good.  They had me blow down some tube to see how well I could blow.  I guess that normal is 300 or so, and I blew a 440.  Great so far.

    I have another test set up for later this week, but in the mean time they gave me an inhaler to try.

    I tried it before Judo class on Thursday.  The effects were staggering.  I didn’t feel any different when I wasn’t pushing hard, but once we really starting working hard I did.  At the point where I would normally be really winded, and take a break my lungs were amazing.  I felt like such a weight had been lifted off my chest.  It was really invigorating.

    I hope my story might be helpful for someone else out there… I feel so much better.

    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here