Archive for December, 2009

29 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Forget New Year’s Resolutions – They Don’t Work

    This Article comes from JSK Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    Goal setting expert explains real success lies in life plans, not in making resolutions.

    “You can forget about making New Year’s Resolutions if you’re hoping for a successful outcome. Most aren’t worth the paper they’re written on,” says Vic Johnson, a leading goal setting and motivation expert.

    Most New Year’s Resolutions have gone by the wayside before January is over and most won’t even be remembered six months later. And the reason is pretty simple. Most are made in response to something negative; a habit or situation that the person wants to change or end. And therein lies the problem – it’s hard to develop momentum from a negative response. It is always easier to move toward something than away from something.

    Consider one of the most adopted goals — weight loss. No one can get excited about losing weight – it requires deprivation. It’s a negative response to concerns about appearance, health, etc. The results of weight loss New Year’s Resolutions demonstrate their weakness. A survey sponsored by Gardenburger found that more than three-fourths of all women between the ages of 25 and 54 make diet and weight-loss plans each year. Nearly nine of 10 respondents reported only occasional or no success, while almost half lost little or actually gained weight instead.

    “The people who succeed at losing weight and maintaining the loss have usually been motivated by a dream much bigger and more positive than just losing weight,” explains Johnson. “They see themselves living a healthy lifestyle. They begin to act and think like people who are in good physical shape. There’s more of a radical change in a person’s thinking and actions than you see with most resolutions. It wouldn’t be possible to effect and sustain such a radical change unless the person is motivated by a big dream that is positive in nature.”

    Another popular aim is to quit smoking. Johnson himself was a three-pack-a-day smoker until he celebrated a smoke-free New Year’s sixteen years ago. “For over twenty years I had tried to quit many times using every tool and technique I’d hear about. But as long as I was trying to quit, I couldn’t break the grip. Instead, I developed a dream to become a non-smoker. I fell in love with the idea of breathing clean air instead of smoky air, of my body and clothes smelling nice instead of smoky. I thought about how wonderful it would be to taste food again. I decided to start acting and thinking like a non-smoker, and when the thinking took hold I simply quit smoking. In all the years since, I’ve never wanted another cigarette, never even thought about wanting one.”

    According to Johnson, the best goal to set is one that calls for the individual to create a plan for their life based on a set of personal dreams. “Most people are in a free-fall through life, careening from one crisis to the next. If you were going to build a new house and you had this idea for a fabulous master bedroom suite, you wouldn’t rush out and start building the master bedroom. You’d have a complete plan before you started. When you approach resolutions and goals in the same manner, you end up with a much better chance of achieving success.”

    To set your goals please remember the three components of commitment: Will, Determination, and Focus. Without these your New Years resolution will end as soon as it starts.

    Have a Happy New Year and stay healthy and fit in 2010.


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    29 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Interview with Eddie Edmunds of Team Fusion Academy

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


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    I had the chance to catch up with my Jiu Jitsu instructor, Eddie Edmunds of Team Fusion Academy.  For those who don’t know him, Sensei Edmunds is a very technical black belt under Professor Pedro Sauer and a superb teacher. In fact, I believe he was Pedro Sauer’s first affiliate school/instructor.

    We shot about 30 minutes of video to accompany this interview and I have put some clips throughout this post. (I also released some of the footage in my post about z guard.)   If you want to see the whole thing, you have two options.  You can download it in high quality (614 meg) by right-clicking “save as” with this link: Bart and Eddie.wmv . Or you can view it in pieces on my youtube channel here.

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    Bart: Thanks Eddie for talking with me. I know you’ve been around martial arts for a long time – tell me a little bit about your background in martial arts.

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    Eddie: Thanks for the opportunity to speak with you Bart. Although I studied Karate and Kung Fu, the first martial art that I truly loved and enjoyed was Jeet Kune Do, Kali and western boxing under a master named Dan Berry. Dan Berry learned JKD and Kali under Michael Moore who was a direct student of Dan Inosanto. He was and still remains the most combatively oriented martial artist i have ever known. Only someone who trained under Dan can tell you what I mean. His capability with the stick and empty hand was second to none. Dan was not only a master, but an innovative genius.

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    Dan Berry was an assistant instructor at the Hawkeyes wrestling club under Dan Gable – so he already had some pretty decent grappling experience. Well, there was a seminar in Utah with Rickson Gracie and Pedro Sauer. Dan Berry went down there and came back blown away.

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    He got tapped by Rickson over and over. It was shocking to him as Dan had good grappling skills. However, there were no strikes involved in this match. If there were, I believe the outcome would have been different.

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    So Dan comes back and tells all of us that we will need to get a blue belt under the Gracies in order to get a black belt under him. He was that converted. It was Dan Berry who introduced us all to Pedro Sauer, and that was my induction into the world of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu.

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    Bart: Every time you talk about your Jiu Jitsu lineage, I can feel the admiration and respect you have for Pedro Sauer. For those who don’t know him personally, can you explain to us why you call him “Professor” and why having a black belt under him is special?

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    Eddie: Over the years, chess masters have been studied because of their encyclopedic knowledge of looking at a chess board and need to make the right moves to win the game. Pedro Sauer definitely has an encyclopedic memory of chess moves. The quality that distinguishes him from a chess master is that he is actually doing something against a physically resistant opponent – while the chess master performs in the cerebral domain and can just move a chess piece without concern for the opponent resisting. Jiu Jitsu is much different. The Jiu jitsu expert performs in the cerebral and the physical domain, and this is a huge difference between chess and jiu jitsu.

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    Pedro also comes to the mat with personal instruction from Helio Gracie, the father and founder of Gracie Jiu Jitsu. He received his black belt under Helio but he also earned a black belt from the Jiu Jitsu god himself: Rickson Gracie. Pedro’s technical knowledge is second to none. He has details about details.

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    In addition, Pedro has the gift to take apart and put back together a move inside his head, so that he can watch someone do something and know immediately whether it is effective or not. Pedro is that rare breed of instructor who has trained with the best instructors in the world and has the specific capacity to analyze Jiu Jitsu like a scientist would to make it better and more efficient.

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    Bart: To return a bit to your experience in martial arts, after training so long, how has studying Jiu Jitsu influenced your personal life and character?

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    Eddie: Out of all the lessons i have learned from Jiu Jitsu, the primary ones are first humility. There is always someone better and you will be tapping till the end of your life. The second is the work ethic. Jiu Jitsu taught me to really take the time and start to study, train and learn the art and not to skip steps. There are not shortcuts with Jiu Jitsu. You either put in the mat time or you don’t get to a high level; it doesn’t happen any other way. I would say those two things have influenced me the most. Third would be encouraging my team members. I like to see them improve and I really believe Jiu Jitsu can help people gain a measure of happiness and confidence as their skill grows. Team Fusion is made of of some of the best people I know and it is exciting to see it grow.

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    eddie and students

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    Bart: What kinds of things have you incorporated into the training focus and philosophy at Team Fusion Academy?

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    Eddie: One facet of the academy that I really try to promote is a team environment. My initial training with Pedro was like the wild west. I can’t tell you how many guys came into our academy Pedro would say something like “Eddie Edmunds my friend, I want you to go with this guy and go easy on him.”

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    That meant to tap the guy fast … as he wasn’t going to be nice to me.

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    Our training was technical but we had to prove Jiu Jitsu each week as people really doubted its effectiveness. While we may still have guys come in to try and disprove Jiu Jitsu, our focus is to build a very strong grappling team. I have gi and no gi classes and we teach takedowns in addition to the ground game. I believe this type of cross-training is very comprehensive for everyone.

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    Bart: You’ve trained with a lot of great guys and seen a lot of students progress through the ranks. In terms of Jiu Jitsu, what can you tell me about guys who become legitimately good vs the guys who just hover around the mediocre level? Off the top of your head, what are two or three things that separate the casual from the skilled?

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    edmundssaulo

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    Eddie: The guys who become very good – or even great – are individuals who learn from the best and consistenly train. Meet the best guys and learn from them. People like Saulo Ribeiro, Pedro Sauer, Cobrinha and Rickson Gracie all have different approaches to Jiu Jitsu – and it helps to learn from a variety of people. However, I’ll be truthful, the ideal way to learn is to roll with the best and have them coach you.

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    That is how Pedro Sauer got so good. He told me that he took privates from Rickson and they would roll and Rickson would correct him. In my opinion there is no better way to accelerate your game than to have that kind of coaching..

    Outside of that, every person should have the five tools of Jiu Jitsu: a notebook, video camera, qualified instructor, cross training and thought. I say thought because you don’t’ become great unless you sit down and really think about Jiu Jitsu. Study and analyze your game. Analyze a match and try to discern how individuals are finding leverage. Rickson asked many, many questions in his quest for becoming better at the gentle art and I never forgot that.

    .Eddie-training-with-jacare


    Bart: As a black belt, how does the jujitsu game change vs your approach as a white or blue belt?.

    Eddie: My approach to Jiu Jitsu as a black belt versus a white belt is radically different. For some guys they may say it isn’t, but I learned Jiu Jitsu much differently because I was a product of the times. Pedro was right out of Brazil and the Gracies wanted to prove the effectiveness of Jiu Jitsu. We were always training hard and going for the kill. At least I was.

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    Bart: Thanks so much Eddie, I’ve enjoyed chatting with you. Before we close, how can people get contact and train with you? Also, who else do you have teaching down at Fusion?

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    Eddie: Our website is www.FusionBJJ.com . We are located at 650 East, Wilmington Avenue (2180 south) in Sugarhouse UT.

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    We have three black belts teaching at our school: Gustavo Rodrigues (Carlson Gracie), Mike Colby (Walt Bayless) and Eddie Edmunds (Pedro Sauer). We also have great assistant instructors as well.

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    Bart, thank you for the opportunity for this interview. I appreciate you being one of the members of Team Fusion and you are one of the students who works hard and is constantly learning and trying to improve. I appreciate you taking the time to do this.

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    Bart: Thank you.


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    23 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Mobile Self-Defense

    This Article comes from JSK Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    Carjackings are on the rise as a crime strategy. Why? They provide the criminal with relatively easy and undetectable approach and, the criminal’s following car provides a quick and viable escape resource.

    Remember, every crime requires opportunity and position and, distance and awareness are our two most important self-defense skills. Always approach your car decisively and practice several defensive strategies in advance with your children and loved ones. Imagine several danger scenarios, perhaps ones that have appeared in news reports and consider how you would react. Practice several defensive scenarios with your children much like they practice and emergency or fire drill at school.
    Drive purposefully, communicate calm and confidence when in your car. Avoid distractions – cell phone, loud music and kids or other passengers out of control. Realert yourself as you enter or exit your vehicle. Home invasions are frequently launched as the homeowner drives into their driveway or garage. Always check your driveway access and rear view mirror for suspicious vehicles or persons.
    Drivers tend to get in their car and sit, talking on the phone, referencing paperwork, etc. Do Not Do This! Carjackers consider this a perfect opportunity to strike. Give yourself permission to make a scene in a threatening situation. If an assailant ever gets in your car and holds a weapon on you, give up your car immediately. Experts tell us to never drive away with an assailant. Consider the alternative of driving into an obstacle, building or street post. Consider your response in advance.

    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    22 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Steve Spencer
  • KFM: Keysi and MMA


    Keysi elbow strike

    Keysi elbow strike

    Those of you who have been actively following this site are probably already aware that we have had a few posts recently in regards to the Keysi Fighting Method, also known as KFM.

    The Keysi began to get more public exposure when it was chosen as the fighting style to be used in some of the recent Batman movies.  It’s a very distinct looking style, different than anything else you might have seen.  It’s very fast, and very much focuses on closing the distance and fighting in closer quarters than where most fighting style are really effective.

    My own interest in the style came when a reader wrote in asking about anyone teaching the style here in Utah.  Although I have not been able to find anyone in Utah who knows much about the style, I have traded emails with an instructor in the style from out of state.  I also recently got a chance to watch a 60 minute video on Keysi made by its creators that instructs a person on the basics of Keysi and its “Pensador”, or “Thinking Man” stance which is the foundation of the style.

    Although I have not seen anyone truly fight with Keysi, and am going on just a few videos, articles, and emails, I want to give my own opinion on Keysi and how it might function in Self Defense or in an MMA situation.

    Keysi and Self Defense:

    Most people on the streets throw hay-makers, upper cuts, and then go to the ground.  In my opinion Keysi would function very well in such a situation.  Keysi quickly closes the gap to disable hay-makers, and protects well until the gap is closed.  Once inside the elbow strikes of Keysi should be an ugly scene for a typical brawler.  Also, since most street fights concentrate on head strikes the Pensador user should be able to stand fairly upright and resist being pulled to the ground.  Against a good grappler, even just an ex-high school wrestler however, I think Keysi will need to inflict a lot of damage and end things quickly, as KFM is not a ground style.

    Keysi and MMA:

    Again, the Keysi style may well be able to close the gap well and inflict damage.  I think where it may face trouble is when the distance is closed and the opponent begins to use a Muay Thai clinch.  Although Keysi is able to defend such strikes it relies on leaning down to block.  In emails I was assured that the KFM fighter doesn’t lean low enough to really be at risk of being pulled down due to dropping their head, but in watching the videos I have to draw my own conclusion.

    I believe that the method of protecting the head with the Pensador, which is similar in many ways to the defensive style we have seen employed by such fighters as Tito Ortiz against head punches would work well.  I think that leg and body kicks will be a huge problem for a KFM fighter if they are unable to close as quickly as they desire.  Once inside I think a KFM fighter will do well against someone who wants to stand with them, but could be in trouble if the opponents prefers the ground game.

    Summary: Pretty neat for self defense.  Good defensively.  Can help with elbow striking skills and make for a good close range game.  Weak against kicks, and easily pulled to the ground (especially by a Muay Thai clincher, a kicker, or someone good with uppercuts.)

    I may be proven wrong, and would love to watch it in the cage, but that’s my 2 cents worth.

    18 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • January 9th Xtreme Combat Fights in Eagle Mountain!

    This Article comes from XtremeCombatUtah’s MySpace Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    Xtreme Combat Utah Jan 9th

    Some of the fighters that will be on this January 9th card are Nick Rossborough, Tallon Torres, Kevin Hamby, The Hatch Twins (Jarome and Jared), Josh Buck, Brandon Ploehn, Jason Dalton, Jeremy Hooley, Cole Rose and more to come…. you can get your tickets online at www.myspace.com/xtremecombatut or any of our vendor outlets



    18 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Steve Spencer
  • Xtreme Combat: Jan 9th

    Word’s just out: The next installment of Xtreme Combat Utah will be out in Eagle Mountain on January 9th.  We’re still waiting on fight card, and location details, but I wanted to let you all know as soon as possible so you could be sure to mark your calendars.

    Here are a few pictures from the last event:

    Xtreme Combat Utah

    Xtreme Combat Utah

    Xtreme Combat Utah

    Xtreme Combat Utah

    Xtreme Combat Utah

    Xtreme Combat Utah

    16 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Damarques Johnson Chokes Out Edgar Garcia

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


    ufc107-johnson-garcia01

    Congratulations to Damarques for his win via triangle choke at UFC 107.  To date, this is no doubt the most important fight in his career. His win secured him the submission of the night award – a financial boost that I hope can keep him full time fighting and performing in the UFC.

    I saw Damarques a few weeks prior to the fight and wished him well – he seemed relaxed and ready. I think its been a long time coming, and he deserves the success.

    Me and Damarques Johnson

    Again, congrats.


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    15 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • That which is weak shall become strong

    This Article comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    Utah Martial Arts Hell_Sign

    I have to tell you, that class over at Hidden Valley was amazing on Saturday.

    We started out by pairing up, and working on some light randori.  But “light” can quickly become amazingly taxing.  Mike really kept on us.  Once we would stand up, he kept pushing the pace, pushing us to grab back onto some one an keep going.  To improve our endurance, and equally important: to teach us to perform when we are tired.

    As we worked, I commented to Mike that I was struggling a little with fighting out of bottom position in a side control.  I have a good strong bridge, but just was a little out of practice.  Mike gave me exactly what I needed: An off-ramp to hell.  He grabbed someone, and had them take side control on me.  Once I fought free, he would throw a new, fresh person at me, and have them take side control.

    This really pushed me, and gave me exactly what I needed, in addition to teaching me more by interacting with so many different people and body types.

    So the morale for this story?

    Be willing to, an even eager to embrace your weakness and make it strong.  Whatever it is you are challenged with, push it to the utmost limits.  Don’t just “work with it a little.”  Work with your sparring partners to have them push you beyond your limits and your comfort zone.  Into fatigue and beyond.  This is when you really improve.  This is the true gain.

    Thanks Mike!


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    12 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Seminar Recap: Brandon Ruiz

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


    Brandon Ruiz .  

    The seminar last Saturday with submission grappler extraordinaire, Brandon Ruiz, was amazing.  Brandon mainly talked about takedowns, posture, clinching,  and grip fighting. He gave a couple of core concepts that have changed the way I think about the standup game. Anyway, let me share a few of the insights as best I can.

    agood days 030

    The double leg takedown.

    Most people drive directly toward their opponent as if they will be running right through them.  The problem with this is that you land in the guard. In MMA, instead of having a game plan of 1. Score takedown 2. Pass guard 3 Punish opponent – why not skip step 2 altogether? IF you land in a guy’s guard, you’re opening yourself up to submission risks that you wouldn’t have in side control.

    Instead, you want to utilize takedowns that solve this problem before it starts. Brandon taught a version of the double leg from clinching positions taught to him by one of his coaches at the Olympic training center that involves lateral movement. This variation has the benefit of never touching your knees to the mat.

    The procedure is as follows: Get inside position (more on that later), armdrag/bump/schuck, keep low-but-upright posture, shuffle laterally, lift the far leg and pass the near leg as to avoid the guard.

    Entering in with an armdrag

    Here’s Eddie Edmunds finishing the takedown like Brandon taught.

    Eddie finishes double leg

    Once you throw your enemy to the ground in ruin, its time to give him a fair option.  Ankle submission or side control. You sink in a catch-wrestling foot lock – and your opponent has to choose between defending the lock or have you pass his guard. He can’t do both. Obviously, there are more details – if only you were there to have Mr. Ruiz to explain them to you, you’d be set.

    Inside Position

    Brandon gets inside position 

    I’ve used judo style clinch in the past, so I was especially interested in Brandon’s Greco-Roman and submission wrestling clinch work. His bread and butter was “inside position” which was one hand on the bicep, one hand on the collar bone.  Simple, but effective.

    Brandon showed us how to arm drag, fireman’s carry, double leg, and hip throw from this position. His setups were super solid. Even a wrestling novice like me was able to use them effectively against bigger and stronger opponents (which was about 75% of the people  at the seminar).

    Two on One

    two on one control take down 

    So you’ve tried to armdrag and take the back, but your opponent is turning round you like a merry-go-round. Or maybe your opponent has let you grab one of his arms with both of yours. With the two on one position gained, the world is your oyster. Brandon showed us some principles about posture and hand placement that really make this position work – forearm into the armpit and cutting a straight line in front of the guy, using your head to wedge in his jaw.

    From here there were several options. One move he showed us came from Kali stick fighting – a simple move that makes you say, “I can’t believe that this works!” – but it works very well. Another one was a wrestlers version of judo’s uchi mata. If they try to stop it, you’re set up for an awesome snap down and subsequent back taking.

    chinstrap and taking the back

     

     

    Dealing with the guard

    the guard

     

    Don’t. Deal with taking top

     

    Submissions and other things

    leg locks

    Leg locks and chin-straps, forcing submissions, taking control via first contact – there was a ton of stuff. Brandon taught for two plus hours, and then we did king of the hill and sparring drills. I’ll stop myself from droning on and I’ll sum up. It was awesome training.

    Also, if you read this in time – Brandon is competing down in Florida right now – check www.themat.com to watch the FILO championships live. If you don’t catch them streaming, they’ll most likely have youtube links up.


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    9 Dec 2009

  • Posted by Paul Evans
  • Fatigue Drills

    Any Krav Maga instructor worth his salt knows that we are making a mistake if we just train techniques. Techniques have to be applied under stress, during drills and in scenarios that come as close as possible (given logistics and safety issues) to reality. This is a basic tenet of our training. “Success” for our students can’t be measured by their understanding of the technique…to the extent that it can be measured at all, it has to be measured in their ability to perform that technique adequately under extreme stress.

    But what happens when they fail? What tools or training are we giving them when the technique doesn’t work? When the gunman pulls back on the gun too fast for us, or we fail to trap the knife arm? This is a worthwhile topic for discussion and, in my opinion, a totally legitimate area of training that many of us might not be exploring. As instructors, we should ensure that our students training includes real-time reactions to situations where our vaunted techniques get fucked up.

    The obvious (and very Krav Maga-like) solution is aggressiveness. If you miss the gun during Gun From The Front (for example), burst in, catch the gun any way that you can, and counterattack like a madman until the threat is neutralized. But I want to give me students a basic strategy for how to burst in (all call this family of defenses my “Oh shit” defenses…not sure how I’m going to publish that). Once they understand the defense and can execute it aggressively, I want them to experience failure and react aggressively and decisively to that situation. I build into the training drills moments of flawed technique or extra-sharp attacker reactions and make the defenders deal with it.

    There is a downside to this training. I can almost guarantee the following: if you incorporate drills where the defender must attempt one technique, fail, and then transition to some other movement, at least some of your students will cheat the first technique in order to prepare for the second. This is obviously unacceptable. They must make the initial defense decisively and aggressively…and THEN make adjustments on the fly if things don’t work out. (Can you think of a better metaphor for life?)

    This last observation begs the question: when in training do we incorporate these sorts of failure drills? If we introduce them too early, then we destroy the student’s confidence in the basic technique. A good rule of thumb is to let the student train on the basic technique until they have a good, solid understanding and can execute it well under stress. Once they have that ability, start pushing the envelope. Introduce them to real-life scenarios where failure is certainly a possibility, then give them tools to use in those situations.

    Obviously, we must start with basic techniques and principles—not simply because those techniques and principles are inviolate, but because those tools allow students to act decisively and aggressively, and it is decisiveness and aggressiveness that will safe their lives. Once they have those basic ideas, they must transfer that decisiveness, they must use that aggressiveness, during higher stress situations that are outside their comfort zone. When we do that, we are bringing them a greater measure of safety.

    Don’t Forget about the John Whitman Seminar Feb 6th. We will be covering Home Invasions and Gun Defenses.