Archive for January, 2011

29 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Ju-ju? I do, I do, I DO!!!!

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    There are plenty of reviews of Bullyproof out there (and some pending…Georgette :) ) I don’t plan on reviewing it anytime soon, but I at least wanted to share how my own kids have responded to the program.

    I’ve been playing the Gracie Games from Bullyproof with my oldest girl for just over a month now. Lindy loves to put the videos in, watch the demos and then play with Daddy. So far she’s gotten pretty good at Spiderkid, Crazy Horse and Crocodile Control level 1. I try to spend at least 10 minutes with her each day, but sometimes I forget and she reminds me that we need to play jitsu (or ju-ju) like she did today.

    So, this is my contribution to the Bullyproof reviews…a testimonial from a three-year-old:
    (…)
    Finish reading Ju-ju? I do, I do, I DO!!!!.


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    29 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Home Workout: Guard Work with a Heavy Bag

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Wrestling
    To see the full original article click here


    If you’re like a lot of BJJ practitioners you’re probably wishing you had more of one very important thing….time to train. Here is a great workout you can do in 15 minutes at home with a heavy bag to develop your guard. I show guard drills, arm lock drills, and even some striking. These drills help a lot because they are simple yet super effective movements that the majority of practitioners either gloss over or skip altogether. Training your body to efficiently perform these movements on a daily or every other day basis will improve your guard game in less than a month!

    See the video here!


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    26 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Steve Spencer
  • And The Next Article Is By… You?

    If you’re reading this site, then odds are that you practice, or are all least interested in MMA or one or more of the Martial Arts (or you’re my mom… Thanks Mom!)

    Yup… We knew it.

    This site receives thousands of readers each month just like you, who read these articles.

    In addition to knowing that you are interested in this stuff, guess what else we know?  Opinions are like butt holes… We know you have one.  and we want to hear it.

    Do you practice things a bit different than how others do?  Do you think something you read here is full of crap, and need to voice your own perspective?  You you get frustrated that Hapo-Kiji-Minudo-Ji-Do just doesn’t get the respect it deserves?  Well, let us help you get that message in front of thousands of people.  Let them know who you are.  Be heard!

    So, here’s how it works: Contact me through this simple form.  I’ll email you back.  You reply to my email and tell me what you want to say.

    That’s it.  It doesn’t have to look perfect, and you don’t have to be a professional writer.  If you need any help word smithing it, we’ll help you out.

    Sha-blam!  Look at you FINALLY getting yourself and the art you practice (or your opinion on the last fights, and what people should be doing different) the respect and exposure that you have deserved ever since Sally cheated at that damned spelling bee!

    23 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • The cast of 300 didn’t train BJJ, but…

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    …they could teach most of us a thing or two about focus and discipline.

    If you have never read this post by Mark Twight of Gym Jones about training the cast of 300, you ought to do so. Here’s the link, right HERE. Mark responds very forcefully to the long list of doubters who believed the amazing physique of the Spartans came from years of training and steroid overdose. (It didn’t, by the way…it came from a few months of killer cross-training and a responsible diet.)

    The question is, have you ever been a “doubter” at BJJ training? Have you ever been frustrated at that lower belt who gets you with the same submission over and over, and made the excuse that they were “just using muscle?” Or maybe you’re not progressing as fast as the next guy / girl on the mat. Or maybe you’re the one who offers excuses every time you get tapped.

    If you’re that person (I find myself there every now and then, I’m ashamed to say), read and re-read Mark’s post. And then get off your butt and go to work.

    (…)
    Finish reading The cast of 300 didn’t train BJJ, but….


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    22 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Don’t Build a House (or a guard pass) On A Sandy Foundation

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog



    Don’t put the cart before the horse.

    You must walk before you can run.

    Pick your proverb.

    I’ve been so excited about trying out angles and pressure from inside the guard that I forgot something very important. Randy was good enough to point it out to me. Whenever I focus on passing like that, my posture and base goes to crap (thanks, Randy!). He didn’t say it that way, of course, but it’s the truth. My poor posture was opening the door for sweeps and shutting down any power I had, putting me in danger of submissions.

    This new guard-passing technique feels really different from the basic guard passes I’ve been doing since day 1. I’ve been excited to try it, but I could feel myself muscling the move and losing patience.

    Then it hit me. I have been harping on the whole idea of position before submission. Well, the same idea applies to guard passing. <!–more–> I was trying to pass the guard without having a solid base. Before I can use this pass, I needed a solid understanding of how to maintain a strong base and keep my posture up. More than that, I need to understand the ways in which my opponent will try to throw me off balance and negate my offense.

    Maybe this pass is too advanced for me. But more likely it’s this: to achieve my goal, I have to break it down into smaller goals. Rather than force the guard pass, the next two weeks I’ll be exclusively maintaining my base while in guard…kneeling, on one knee, and on two feet. Little by little, I’ll start creating angles, advancing the guard pass and pay attention to how it affects my posture and base. I figure if I work on it this way, I’ll have the technique down solid in a few months.

    Dolph from BJJ Blues wrote a post last year called “My Guard Is A Swamp.” So, I guess I’m working on the opposite: becoming unsinkable. In a non-Titanic way.

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    19 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • BJJ Black Belt Brandon Ruiz on Goal Setting for Jiu-Jitsu

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Wrestling
    To see the full original article click here


    BJJ Black Belt Brandon Ruiz on Goal Setting for Jiu-Jitsu
    January 19, 2011



    by Daniel Mower

    Goals have only been marginally successful for me in the past. I always saw them as a list of wishes…nice things to aim for that could possibly happen if I was lucky and didn’t get distracted.


    The notion that goals can help you improve your Brazilian jiu-jitsu sounds cool. But goals, like Brazilian jiu-jitsu, work based on principles and techniques. Until you understand the techniques, setting goals is just that…wishful thinking that will end in failure.

    Brandon Ruiz is what I would call a “black belt goal setter.” I was introduced to Brandon through my coach, Dave Johnson. Both are BJJ black belts under the Machado flag in Utah. Despite family and work requiring much of his time, Brandon has been a very successful competitor, particularly in no-gi, winning numerous tournaments (most recently at Pancrase and NAGA in 2010). He attributes that success in competition to setting and reaching goals.


    The goal-setting techniques Brandon has taught me in the last few months have changed the way I train for the better. I don’t know a single BJJ practitioner (especially a beginner) who doesn’t want to improve at Brazilian jiu-jitsu. And if learning to set goals can speed that process up, who wouldn’t want to at least hear about it?

    Click here to read more!







    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    19 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Check out my article on The Fightworks Podcast!

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    Good news! The Fightworks Podcast just published an interview I did with one of my coaches, Brandon Ruiz. Brandon is awesome at using goals to advance his grappling training, and he shares some of his secrets in this interview. I’ve been applying the stuff he teaches over the last month or so, and I have already noticed how much more focused and beneficial my training is.

    Check out the interview, it’s good stuff!

    http://thefightworkspodcast.com/2011/01/19/set-goals-bjj/

    Brandon Ruiz at FILA 2009 Grappling World Championships

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    18 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • BJJ Legend Pablo Popovitch asks for BJJ community to help after tragic landslide

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    For those of you who aren’t familiar with Pablo Popovitch, he’s an incredible grappler who has won numerous world titles and was recently inducted into the NAGA Grappling Hall of Fame. He’s probably most famous for defeating Marcelo Garcia at the ADCC world championships in 2009.

    This post on Pablo Popovitch’s website recently came to my attention.

    I can’t imagine the absolute nightmare Pablo is going through right now, but I know it takes a huge amount of humility and desperation for a man to ask for money. Many of us are very sheltered in our safe little corners of the world, away from the seemingly endless natural disasters that cause so much devastation.

    Thankfully Pablo has a support group to reach out to in the BJJ community. I can’t think of a better support group. If you’re able to even throw a few dollars his way, every little bit will help.

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    18 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • The difference between Gracie Jiu-jitsu and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. Revisited. Again.

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    Some of you are undoubtedly thinking “oh no…here we go again.”

    I’m not here to argue which is better, or if there is a difference at all. Smarter, more experienced people than me have argued that one to death, particularly in light of the much-lauded and much-criticized Gracie University online.

    This email went out from Gracie Insider the other day, and now that people have had a little more time to chew on the whole Gracie University concept, I think it makes for an interesting read.

    Go ahead and read the article. I’ll wait. The internet is patient (you’d better come back and comment, though).

    The article is a reply to a YouTube comment on Sacha King’s (a certified Gracie instructor in the UK) channel, which criticizes the lack of sparring in the Gracie Jiu-jitsu program until blue belt. Sacha gives an explanation that really clarified the whole Gracie Jiu-jitsu philosophy in my mind.

    The difference, Sacha says, is the focus on self-defense vs. sport. I know, I know…an old argument. I too believe that the crossover between sport and self defense in BJJ a huge. But think about it…is that crossover so large that it justifies disregarding GJJ as a source of “street-specific” techniques?

    How about sparring with strikes? MMA fighters get this, but shouldn’t we have at least basic experience in it as BJJ practitioners? (…)
    Finish reading The difference between Gracie Jiu-jitsu and Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. Revisited. Again..


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    16 Jan 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Real world experience with Judo and Jiu Jitsu

    This Article comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    The following was recently written by Travis Woodward, a student at Hidden Valley Mix Martial Arts, where I train with him, and consider him my friend:

    How has Judo and Jiu-Jitsu worked for me?

    On Saturday night my brother came down from Logan to party.  He convinced my other brother to buy him alcohol and Zach began to party at Jared’s apartment.  Some time later, after having been cut off from the alcohol and threatening those at the “party” he left in his car.  Unfortunately driving drunk is bad and he crashed his car but thankfully no other cars or persons were involved.

    Enter the parents!

    Yes my parents went to rescue him to, hopefully, avoid a DUI/DWI.  When they came upon the scene he was in the back seat asleep with the car on.  My father drove his car home and mom drove him home in the van.  About 3 blocks away from the house my mom, scared he was going to do something, told him to get out of the car and he said no and that she couldn’t make him.  So she decided to just get home.

    By the time she drove the additional 3 block he had pasted out in the back.  My mom tried to get him out of the car and got knocked in the snow.  My father who had just got out of my brother’s car, turned and say mom in the snow and said “What the hell; did he just push you in the snow?” All of the sudden Zach went into a drunken rage and began to go after our father.  He tackled our father to the concrete and began hitting and choking him while yelling “You think you can fight me?”   Now my father, scared for his life and unable to breath, began to panic.

    Thankfully I was inside and couldn’t sleep.  I went outside just in time to see my mother get up out of the snow and asked her “Did he just do that?”  Ignoring me she dialed 9-1-1 and ran towards the commotion I was hearing.  I finished putting on my coat and went to see what was going on and that is when I heard the call.  I heard my dad yell “I can’t breath get Travis, get Travis.”

    I turned the corner at full speed and saw my brother on top of our father beating him and choking him.  I took a flying leap and tackled him off of my dad.  Once on the ground I took side control and then I took his arm across his face and rolled him on his side to trap both arms.  Zach began to try and weasel out and began to complain he couldn’t breath.  I told him to calm down, I put him on his side so he could breath and was not applying any pressure.

    Next thing I know he is trying to get up and rolled back onto his back so I took side control.  I worked for an Americana and began to make sure he stayed down.  He started to sit up and so I slid into Kesa Gatame.

    Kesa Gatame was really fun and as I sat there he began to try and hit me with his other arm.  Because of the position and angle the punches had no force behind them.  He began to try and shuffle around to get out of the pin and couldn’t.  He tried to sit up and couldn’t and couldn’t do anything.  It was pretty fun.  At some point he got his arm out and though I could’ve transited to another pin or something else I went back into side control.

    Once in side control the Americana (shoulder lock) was right there again so, tired of this, I went to hurt him.  I put on a tight Americana and began to crank on it.  At this point my dad, recovered from the fight, grabbed the arm I was working the Americana and forced it to the ground so I took control of the other to keep him down.  Zach began to spout fire words and threatened everyone.  Tired of this I figured I would put him to sleep while waiting for the police.  I put him into a tight cross collar choke just as the police walked up and then handed him off to them.

    At a few times throughout the fight I saw him trying to tap and just wanted to make this one point.  In real life tapping out doesn’t work so don’t accept it the tap out is reserved for practice and the mat, period.

    I am very thankful that I had the knowledge and training in judo and jiu-jitsu because those few minutes of rolling on the ground would’ve gone very differently if I didn’t know what to do.  Because I knew I was able to subdue Zach, in his drunken rage, while the police were on the way.  The unfortunate part of this whole experience is that Zach broke my father’s back when he tackled him and he had to have surgery to fix it.  But if I wasn’t there or didn’t know what to do dad could be dead right now.

    Thank you Mike, Steve, Dr. Chen, and everyone else who has taught and trained me at the Hidden Valley Mixed Martial Arts.  Without you the outcome of this unfortunate circumstance would be much worse.


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