Archive for February, 2011

26 Feb 2011

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  • When life throws you lemons…

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    Hi everyone. I just wanted to jump in and explain my absence over the last few weeks. First, I lost my job. I worked for a small business that went south (figuratively) this quarter and had to lay off most of its workforce. Bleh. For the last several weeks, I have spent every spare minute of time building resumes, making phone calls and interviewing. Result = SUCCESS: I secured a job that pays higher than my last one. I start Monday.

    So, next, we got a letter from our landlords giving us 60 days notice to move out so they could move back in. So on top of worrying about a new job, I’m hurriedly scanning the horizon for a place to shelter my family and call home for the next year or two.

    Change is good. Really, I like being faced with challenges and having to cope. It’s like fighting a new guy who comes into your school wearing a blue belt. You just don’t know what to expect, but without a doubt it will require you to be alert and creative. Problem is, change is also stressful. And right now it’s very…very…stressful.

    I have lots to talk about, including some fun shirts that I want to share with you all. Training has been really great lately. Plus, you can expect an upcoming review of the Padilla lightweight, and an interview with Rigan Machado.

    But first, I have to find a place to live. Excuse me while I go take 15 Advil.

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    © SkinnyD for Arcanum, 2011. |
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    25 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • UFC 127 and Maciej Jewtuszko’s Huge Head

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


    I’d like you to get pumped for the awesome Maciej Jewtuszko vs Curt Warburton face off at 155 lbs.  Many of you are pumped for the BJ Penn vs John Fitch fight – rightfully so that will be an awesome brawl – but consider this:

    BJ Penn’s dome is a square-ish pumpkin, small. Pretty sweet, but pretty normal. How lame.

    bj penn pumpkin

    Maciej’s cranium, on the other hand, is comical; both in the sense it’s funny (but we would never say anything directly in front of him, due to his fist to face KO of Anthony Njokuani) and straight out of a comic book – this guy’s chrome is a gift from super villiany. It’s like he stole Lex Luthor’s engorged brain only to jam it into skull of malnurished jackal.

    Maciej-Jewtuszko - mega mind

    Jewtuszko’s head is on a different level.

    Kettle_Gourd

    Fun fact: Maciej’s true power does not come his hard polish background, but from his over-sized nogin.

    Anyway, hope you get to enjoy the fights.


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    24 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Quick Video Tip: Sweep from butterfly guard

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


    In class the other day, we played around with the Butterfly sweep/Jean Jacques sweeps. While there are a number of technical details, the one I’ve had emphasized to me is the body posture/structure. If you directly underneath a guy, its tough to lift him – but if you’re to the side a bit, you don’t have to lift his whole weight. I’ve let a chimpanzee draw what I mean.

    butterfly sweep

    Pretending you’re the blue dot, preparing to sweep the red triangle, you note that once you’re at the side, you can lift up the corner and topple over your opponent. Obviously there is more going on with the sweep, but we’ve reached my two-dimensional artistic limits; the video below goes over the main talking points for this sweep, including the one we stressed in class: scoot your butt to the side!

    In case that wasn’t enough, .you can follow Stephen Kestings’ explanation of the butterfly sweep, with photographs!


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    24 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Fit-Jitsu: Expanding your Anaerobic Tank

    This Article comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    This article is guest written by Scott Vincent, who teaches a Fit-Jitsu class at Hidden Valley MMA:

    I grew up in a military family.  After I turned 18, I went into the Marine Corps.  I ran at the very least, 3 times per week and 3 miles each session for 6 years.  By the end of a 3 month boot camp, my final time for the 3-mile run was 18:09…that’s maintaining a 6:03 pace per mile.  Yea, that’s awesome.

    After getting out, I maintained my gym and running habits and understandably, my 3-mile fell in time due to my lack of higher-ranks yelling at me, but I could still hold a solid 23 flat….not the best, but enough to be called “fit”.

    Then, on the eve of my 33rd birthday, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu rolled (PUN ALERT!) into my life.  My very first class was an experience; I was shown an Osoto-Gari takedown and a kata-gatame (arm triangle) pin.  Then it was time to roll, and I was tapped out in 25 seconds, and that’s being pretty generous.  I wasn’t arm barred, triangle choked or pinned.  I quit, and I quit out of complete exhaustion.

    What I couldn’t understand was how I got tired so quickly.  It was a different kind of tired.  Sure, my heart was beating but not through my chest.  I was breathing hard, but my body wasn’t tired.  I didn’t understand it. The only thing I understood was that I got my ass handed to me on a giant platter of my own embarrassment.

    I started going through the internet and found out what my problem was.  My problem was that I was feeling the strains of anaerobic stress rather than aerobic. More to come after you read this:

    Your heart rate when exercising can determine whether you are doing aerobic or anaerobic exercise. The maximum heart rate for men is 220 less your age. For women it is 225 less your age. The goal rate for exercising should be 70% of your maximum rate. When the heartbeat is faster than the 70% you are doing aerobic exercises.

    “Zippedy-doo-da, Scott”.  That’s what you’re saying aren’t you, or maybe it’s something more like, “Who gives a sh*t”.  Well, read another passage from  http://www.doctorsexercise.com/journal/aerobic.htm :

    How exercise is performed will determine it to be aerobic or anaerobic. Any type of movement your body makes requires the use of energy. You don’t have to do aerobics to lose weight or maintain a desired weight. It has been determined that anaerobic exercise will burn more calories than aerobic exercise, on a ratio of 5 to1 basis, and even as much as a 7 to 1 ratio. The aerobic exercise will burn 25% muscle and 75% fat, while anaerobic exercise will burn 100% fat.

    With the above being said, I’m 34 years old, so anytime my heart rate is above 129, I’m doing aerobic exercise…straight cardio!  And THERE’S WHERE MY MISTAKE WAS.  I would run my ass off day-to-day and my BJJ endurance was hardly moving.  Instead of slowing down to fewer than 129 on my pulse when running, I would increase the resistance and put forth just as much effort.  In other words, I did whatever I could to make it feel like I was running through mud.  The result is that after I was done, I had the same tired feeling I had when I first got my butt kicked….I had that “different” tired, and now I knew how to prevent it.

    Fit-Jitsu is designed to give you that “different” tired.  For example, the entire program, you will have resistance added to every exercise we do and exercises you’ve never seen.  We incorporate military training with BJJ training to give you the endurance you need. You’ll notice your body becomes tired faster, even if you’re “a great runner”.  Your muscles will last longer without fatigue and of course, we will motivate you to become faster and stronger.  We don’t make you into a machine that can run 10 miles, we make you into a machine that doesn’t stop.


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    13 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • What a week!

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Wrestling
    To see the full original article click here


    This past week was amazing to say the least! It started off like any other then deteriorated quickly as both my wife and I got sick and I missed two days of work. It quickly turned around when two of my high school wrestlers made it to the finals match of the 4A 189 lb. and 5A 215 lb. divisions. Aaron Kuttler (189) of East High School won his title match 9 to 3 against Joseph Carley of Mountain Crest becoming the first East High state champion in years! Lars Oveson (215) of Alta High School fought a tough battle against returning champion Dustin Dennison of Pleasant Grove losing in overtime. Both of our athletes put on a great performance and made me proud!

    Then Saturday night, Koffi “The Lion King” Adzitso, went up against Brandon “The Murderer” Melendez for the PSUAC Welterweight Utah State Championship. Many believed that Melendez would win easily over Koffi…we knew that would not be the case. We had a game plan that included attacking our opponent’s weaknesses and playing to our strengths. Koffi executed beautifully and won by TKO in the first round!

    Koffi has made huge improvements the past year since training with us. His recent wins over Kevin Burns (UFC Veteran) and now Brandon Melendez (TUF Finalist) solidify what I already knew…Koffi is one tough competitor!

    This was a great week for me as a coach to be able to see the success of my athletes and also to re-solidify that the technique I teach and the stategies we employ work across the board and at the highest levels.

    Click here to see our wrestlers in action.

    Click here to see Koffi pre and post fight.


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    10 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Sylvio Behring Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Seminar March 12-13

    This Article comes from Utah Judo

    To see the full original article click here


    A great opportunity presents itself March 12th and 13th 2011, as Master Sylvio Behring visits Utah from Brazil to share his skills and insights.  After attending this seminar last year, Daniel Mower of Arcanum BJJ (one of Utah’s top Jiu Jitsu bloggers) wrote, “Nowadays there are BJJ black belts a-plenty. But there are very few people that are considered masters of the art. Sylvio Behring is one of them. A 7th degree red/black belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu and a black belt in judo, Sylvio has probably forgotten more jiu-jitsu than most of us will ever learn.”

    So who exactly is Sylvio Behring?  Well for starters, he is Anderson Silva’s Jiu Jitsu instructor, a 7th Degree Black Belt in Jiu Jitsu, a Judo Black belt, son of Grand Master Flavio Behring (who studied under Heilio Gracie), student of Alvaro Barreto (another of Heilio’s students), Vice President of the Federation of Jiu Jitsu De Sportive in Rio De Janeiro,  President of the Franco Behring Jiu Jitsu alliance of Canada, and President of the World Black Belt Council.

    Credentials aside, Sylvio has truly forged his name, and that of Behring Jiu Jitsu with his system known as the “progressive guard.”  Unlike how many typical think of “guard”, the Behring progressive guard is much more than just a position on the ground.  It is a series of positions used to protect one’s self, and counter attack from the ground not only when grappling with an opponent, but potentially long before then.

    As Master Sylvio stated, “The progressive guard (and thus the Jiu Jitsu that it is part of) is intended to compliment Karate, and other martial arts, and to work with them in a real-world situation.  It allows you to manage the distance, and manage your defense, wherever your opponent goes.”

    The incorporation of this guard styles, along with the throwing techniques of Judo, and top end Jiu Jitsu is impressive to behold, and a pleasure to learn.  Add to this the refreshingly non-combative insights of the Master regarding how to keep things from escalating to combat in most situations, and you end up with a few hours of time not to be missed.

    This event will be held March 12th from 6:00-9:00 PM, and on March 13th from 10:00 AM through 3:00 PM Mountain.  For more details on this event, and to register, contact Hidden Valley Mixed Martial Arts at UTMMA.com.


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    9 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Quick Video Tip: Double Leg Takedown Defense, “When it’s too late to sprawl”

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


    We were working on some body locks and positioning last night at the U and we went over this counter to the double leg takedown.   In a sense, its not a counter to the double leg takedown because you are still going to the ground. It’s a “make the best of things” type counter.   The guy gets in too deep, too fast to sprawl; its too late to stop him for taking you for a ride.  Best case scenario is that you get to pick the destination. Video below shows Utah local, Brian Yamasaki teaching the move.

    I remember seeing Dan Henderson use something like this in his fight against Jake Shields. He wasn’t able to roll Jake, but kept his hips from getting sucked underneath and got his legs to the side and then to freedom with his belly down.

    Ben Henderson no sprawl


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    9 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Rigan Machado Seminar April 9

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    Rigan Machado

    I’m thrilled to be able to announce that Rigan Machado will be in Utah for a BJJ seminar in April. Rigan is the coach of one of my coaches, Jeff Kunze. I’ve used the term a little loosely before, perhaps, but Rigan is a true legend in BJJ and widely considered one of the best grapplers in history.

    The invitation is open to anyone who wants to come, regardless of school and affiliation. The more the merrier!

    I don’t have details yet, only that the date is April 9 and the invitation is open to anyone who wants to come.

    I’m not going to spend a lot of time expounding on why you need to be at this seminar. If you don’t know who Rigan is and why you should not miss this, it’s time to do a little research and learn about your chosen hobby.

    More good news; (…)
    Finish reading Rigan Machado Seminar April 9.


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    7 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Front Kick to the Face, Anderson Silva @ UFC 126

    This Article comes from SLC MMA

    To see the full original article click here


    mma_silva2x_600

    So…. Anderson Silva knocks out Vitor Belfort with a front kick to the face. It was beautiful. The timing, the distance the expression on Silva’s face … it almost made me cry. Both for the beauty of the thing, but also because my hope for a new champ got KO’d as well.

    The fun thing for me was all the hoopla post fight about the kick. People were going ape-shiz like they have never seen it before, and true, its not a bread and butter thing in the UFC.

    This you probably already know. What you may not know, is that Anderson learned this technique from Steven Seagal, or so says Seagal.

    .

    .

    First of all, is it just me, or does Seagal look like “The Eradicator” from the Superman comic books? Because the glasses really sell the look.

    Seagal is the The Eradicator

    As for his remarks about nobody really using it, etc, also like “The Eradicator”, there may be a small amount of fantasy going on.

    The way I figure it, is that the teep kick from Muay Thai is close match to this kick, and that’s been around from the dawn of time – and Anderson is *ahem* fairly well versed in that. But hey, now that Seagal has brought the front kick to MMA, perhaps we will also see elbows to the face as well. Maybe even punching of the ribs. Who knows the crazy things is store for us?

    Maybe he showed some different pointers or a style of doing it? I don’t know, but it would be awesome to hang out with these guys and find out. I bet its like a rap video, but with hot girls doing ninja stuff instead of clubbing.

    front_kick_face_large

    I originally learned the front kick in Karate, and one time I accidentally kicked an opponent in the throat in a tournament (I was aiming for the face). It’s a nasty kick. A lot of force is going straight forward, and the structure of the stances with you and your opponent is like a head on collision. The kick is a bit slower and harder to hit with; the movement makes it tricky to adjust mid way through. Unlike a circular kick, which can just keep swinging onward to whack into an opponent, it can be avoided with good head movement. Below, a kung-fu version of the kick.

    .

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    The first time I saw the kick in MMA was with Bas Rutten. I remember thinking, “I’m going to have to keep that in my bag of tricks.” I know the resolution on the pics below aren’t amazing, but trust me, it’s Bas. (See video here).

    bas rutten face kickbas rutten front kick

    Here’s a video of Rob Mccullough teaching the rear push kick, a variation of the one that KO’d Vitor.

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    Anyway, the front kick is something we’ll probably see more of know that attention has been brought to it. Here are just a few more pics to please you.

    teep3

    Anderson Silva Front Kick

    muaythaifight2photos8ss6

    True fact: Anytime a front kick to the face happens, a leprechaun gets a pot of gold.


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    3 Feb 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Clearing the Air

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Wrestling
    To see the full original article click here


    For years martial artists have argued “which style or discipline is best?”. For years there has been little resolved until the UFC’s first few tournaments. What I find ironic is even though we’ve learned so much from those first few tournaments in ‘reality based’ competition that the argument has still found a way to resurface and remain strong.

    I’ve noticed in magazines and online that ‘traditional’ martial artists still love to claim the lock on usable ‘real’ skills and abilities. Somehow they’re ‘deadly’ techniques are the best and there is no way a ‘sport’ guy could even hope to hang with them…I completely disagree.

    The history of martial arts in particular, Judo, was instrumental in creating a way for martial artists to train full power in moves that were less debilitating (generally speaking) and allowed for a martial artist to more fully develop their skills. The ‘deadly’ or ‘lethal’ techniques never went away from the art. The ‘sport’ was still based in MARTIAL skills.

    That being said in my own experience “The Rules Make the Game”. Whether you’re fighting for points, trophies or your life, the rules make the game. Combat at its essence is still combat. There may be more or less dangers and some trained responses from one art or ‘sport’ may not transfer as well to another. However here are the advantages of a ‘sport’ guy vs. a ‘traditional’ martial artist:

    1. Real time experience with full power techniques and full resistance. This is critical in real encounters. How many times have you heard ‘it has to be instinctual’? How does a technique or principle become instinctual if you never get to actually use full power or experience full power against you? Without a real time resisting opponent how will you deal with one on the street? My experience with athletes is that those who experience dealing with pressure and resistance eventually come to find ways to execute their game plans and techniques. Under high stress circumstances this is of utmost importance. Execution becomes paramount.

    2. Superior Conditioning. ‘Sport’ guys quickly learn that conditioning can be one of your greatest allies or one of your worst enemies. Without it you won’t last long and your execution will be sloppy at best. With it you stand a great chance of executing your technique and game plan and coming out on top. Let’s be honest few people want to face the ugly monster of conditioning. The ‘sport’ guy at least understands the value of it and is conditioning in order to compete. Conditioning not only allows you to execute your technique it allows you the energy to defend and recover more quickly from your opponent’s attacks.  

    3. Game Plan and Strategy. Traditional martial arts constantly talk about strategy and philosophy. Sport guys actually do it. There is no greater way to develop your strengths than to actually have them tested against those of your opponent. When your opponent is out to defeat you while you’re simultaneously trying to do the same you will experience many setbacks and reality checks. Sometimes you will be exposed to your true weaknesses and lack of skill or strategy. This is one of the greatest advantages that the ‘sport’ guy has…he learns, evaluates and improves on regular basis.

    All that being said each and every martial art or ‘combat sport’ will have something to offer. In real situations the advantage goes to the one who establishes dominance first. The ones who are prepared mentally to deal with pressure situations and still execute will prevail. This is the bottome line.


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