Archive for August, 2011

30 Aug 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Xtreme Citizen September 3rd

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    I don’t know how Xtreme Citizen’s MMA event “Against The Fence” has flown under the radar, but they have. They are going to make a splash this weekend in Layton, Utah at the Davis Conference Center September 3rd. Be there before 7pm so you can get a ticket and find a good seat.

    A little background on Xtreme Citizen:

    “We are Xtreme Citizen MMA/Against The Fence, our fight promotion is named Xtreme Warfare. Our goal is to bring professional and quality fights to the Layton Area on a bi-monthly basis. We are rather new in the area, but we do have several out of state connections and hope to use those connections to help showcase the local fighters and talent here in the Salt Lake Area, since we are based out of West Jordan.” Petie Englert.

    This show seems to be bringing some out of state talent, which in my opinion is needed. I can only watch someone fight each other so many times. With that being said, this should be something that is good for Utah. This event is going to be showcasing local talents such as Trever Mellen, from The Pit Elevated and Eric Tillotson out of Stormin Tillotsons MMA. There will also be local amateurs Stewart Brown, Jorge Carreno and Antonio Hope. They will be facing opponents from Southern California, Idaho and Las Vegas.

     


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    29 Aug 2011

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  • Amateur Rules Could Change The Game.

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    I know most of us don’t know a lot of the “behind the scenes” of the Pete Suazo Utah Athletic Commission. I also know some of you think they’re the illuminati and are against you, but in the end they’re here for the fighter’s safety. With safety comes Amateur rules…and Utah’s differ from the Association of Boxing Commissions. So what are these new rules you ask? Well no we’re fighting till the death…kumate style. Ok maybe not, but here is what Bill Colbert had to say:

    “We are seeking comments on whether or not the commission should implement the Association of Boxing Commissions (ABC) Unified Amateur MMA Rules. The major differences between the ABC adopted Unified Rules and the current Utah Amateur Rules are that kicks to the head are allowed, but contestants are required to wear shin guards. Also, there is a special category for novice amateurs for their first 3 fights where any strikes to the head of a grounded opponent are prohibited. NJ, PA and some other East Coast jurisdictions have already implemented the new rules.” So how does Utah feel about that? I know this will affect many fighters’ game plans and I know a many gyms will be angry as well. I feel the same, but Bill makes a point that I never really thought of:


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    26 Aug 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Quick Video Tip: The Push Kick AKA Foot Jab

    This Article comes from SLC MMA

    To see the full original article click here


    In the first week of class up at the U of U, we worked  the front push kick a bit.  It’s a really fun move, and when you can properly anticipate an opponent advancing toward you, your foot jab takes the wind out of their sails.

    Mainly used as a defensive move, it can nicely counter the straight right of an opponent (assuming orthodox stances) and even various kick attempts.

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    If you are looking for a more aggressive front style kick, used for offense, you can take some cues from Anderson Silva and Lyoto Machida with their recent KO victories using the front leg snap kick variation.


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    26 Aug 2011

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  • Gi Review: Black Eagle Raptor Part 2

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    Apparently I’m like the 4938′th blogger to review the Black Eagle Raptor.

    Well, that just means there are 4937 other lucky grapplers out there who get to wear one of these to training every day. Black Eagle really outdid themselves with the Raptor.

    Lest I sound like a gawking fanboy, you should know I found a few problems with this model that I’ll be exposing in my review; and one flaw in particular would really make think twice about buying it unless they fix it for the production model.

    If you want the short version, here’s the video. For you die-hards, continue on after the video for specifics in measurements, weight, and to find out whether or not I got made fun of for wearing a gi with purple flowing letters on it.

    Video Review

    360-degree Photos

    (click to view in slideshow)

    (…)
    Finish reading Gi Review: Black Eagle Raptor Part 2.


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    25 Aug 2011

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  • Crystal Olsen of One Hit MMA

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    Have you seen this? For those of you who haven’t…this is Crystal and she can kick your ass. She is beautiful and can fight, just ask her last kick boxing opponent. Check out the video and share it!


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    24 Aug 2011

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  • Court McGee Interview.

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


     

     

    By: Ed Kapp via: www.themmakingdom.com

    Ed Kapp: Could you please tell me a bit about your life growing up?

    Court McGee: Yeah, man. I grew up in Layton, Utah on a family farm. We did various chores on the farm and just grew up working, man. I wrestled and did karate—I got into karate when I was about five—and I did that for a number of years. One of my instructors was doing some mixed martial arts training and he said, “Hey, man, you should start wrestling.” I started wrestling and I, kind of, mixed the karate with my wrestling. The first show that I ever saw was ‘The Smashing Machine’ with Mark Kerr—that was the first time that I really saw mixed martial arts and I said, “Wow, man—I want to do that.” Basically, all of the training that I’ve done since I was five, six years old was to become a mixed martial arts fighter later on in life.

    EK: This was always what you intended on doing?

    CM: Yeah—that was the idea. I wrestled, did karate, and later on got into kickboxing—to become a better martial artist—and then I got into two professional boxing matches. I started competing in jiu-jitsu regularly. I was training jiu-jitsu under a certain guy—he would teach me once or twice a week—and I would come back to teach it to the guys in our gym. That’s how I learnt it; it was very basic blue belt-stuff in Brazilian jiu-jitsu. I did that for a couple years and competed as much as possible. Competition breeds champions, so I competed as often as possible; competing in boxing, jiu-jitsu, open wrestling tournaments—that all really helped me progress. February 7th, 2007 was my first mixed martial arts fight and before that, I had competed in 60 or 70 jiu-jitsu matches and I had some open wrestling tournaments that I did pretty well at. I also wrestled in high-school and I did pretty well in that; I was a two-time 5A state-placer and I had a scholarship offer. I ended up losing my scholarship offer, though, because of Title-9. And I didn’t have enough money to go and wrestle out of state, either. I decided to go to a college—Weber State University—and I started hanging out with a couple of my old friends that used to drink and party. I was pissed off at the world, because I wasn’t wrestling and the school that I was going to didn’t offer wrestling—neither did any other school in Utah—and I started partying and drinking. I got into a wreck and shattered my collarbone and was put on pain narcotics. I started mixing the narcotics and, two years later, I ended up overdosing on heroin. I was damn-near homeless; I had lost everything.

    EK: When you were using drugs, how would you describe your life?

    CM: In the beginning? My dad was a beer-drinker, so when we were out camping, we would sneak into my dad’s cooler and we would take a couple of beers and go drink them. I was really responsible in high-school, though; I got pretty good grades, my attendance was really good, I focused mostly on wrestling, too. I did really well in high-school and during the summers I would work, so I might have a beer or two on the weekends—underage—or we would go to where we have a property and have some beers and get drunk. But I always kept it to a minimum. After high-school was over, I started experimenting with muscle relaxers, Xanax, and other pharmaceutical drugs. Then I started mixing all of that with alcohol and it just got progressively worse from there. I figured I was born an alcoholic and a drug addict; that’s the only thing that explains why I can’t have just one beer or, when I’m prescribed a narcotic, I can’t just take them as prescribed.

    EK: Do you think had you had the opportunity to wrestle in university all of that could’ve been avoided?

    CM: For years, that was a big resentment that I had; “all of this shit would’ve never happened,” I would think. My dream was to be a Division I national qualifier or an All-American; that’s what I wanted to do. I also wanted to study to help people who are suffering from diabetes; I thought that I would be able to help people out that weren’t raised properly, that weren’t taught to eat properly—that’s what I wanted to do. I thought that I could be a dietician on the side and pursue a career in martial arts, but things work out for a reason, man. I tried out a few times for ‘The Ultimate Fighter,’ but I didn’t think they would pick me, so it was a huge surprise to be picked for ‘The Ultimate Fighter.’ What I did have was a story, though; I had a drug overdose, I was a drug addict, and an alcoholic, I had been in trouble with the law, I had lost all of my material possessions, I had been to jail multiple times—I was facing felony drug charges. I knew I was a good guy, but I just couldn’t show it when I was drinking and using; I couldn’t do shit, man. I had a hard time going to work, I had lost my relationships with my family; all of the people that I was hanging out with were shooting and doing dope. They said that they were your friends, but I don’t know how good of a friend you can be when you’re strung out on heroin [laughs]—other than trying to hook you up with their heroin, I guess. That’s where I ended up; I ended up in a trailer—messed up on numerous drugs—with a cousin of mine.

    EK: Do you reflect on your past a lot?

    CM: Yeah, quite a bit. It’s part of my story, man. The reason why I fight and compete are pretty clear to me. I compete to carry the message of other people that struggle; there’s a way out, so if I can do it, you can do it. I’m no different than anyone—I’m no different than you, man—I’m just a professional mixed martial artist. Number-two; I do it for the pay-out, so I can provide for my family. I can pay for a home, clean water—and everything else, of course—and I can be able to be a family man. I’ve got a wife and two sons, so this allows me to provide for them. I also do it because I love the competition; I enjoy the training, I enjoy coaching people, I enjoy cornering people. I also have very good relationships with me coaches. I have multiple coaches, but my two main coaches are John Hackleman—the owner and the founder of The Pit—and Jason Mertlich—he’s my jiu-jitsu, ground, and conditioning coach—and they’re equal. It’s a big family and I’m very connected with them; I’m very close to John Hackleman and Jason Mertlich, too. I had a coach that didn’t show up for five weeks and I found out that he was taking money from me—and it was very difficult for me to let him go—but I asked Jason if he would take me through his belt system. He’s a black belt in FOUR7 jiu-jitsu—it’s a really unique combat jiu-jitsu system for mixed martial arts. It’s, like, a 10-15 year process and he stood up and took on the challenge, came on as one of my head coaches, and he’s done a fantastic job. We’ve got a really great relationship and he’s a great coach. I’ve also got four or five training partners who are really close friends and I’ve got an active life in recovery. Sober comes first, though; if I can’t stay away from drugs and alcohol, then I can’t have any of this. I was living in a meth lab trailer, using drugs—I couldn’t even hold a job—and now I’m a pro athlete in the UFC and I won ‘The Ultimate Fighter,’ I just recently bought a home, I’ve got two vehicles that I’ve paid for, my debt is paid off—and I’m not rich by any means—but I’m comfortable and I’ve got my family. I couldn’t ask for a better life, you know? This life allows me to convey my message and, maybe, help someone with their recovery—you couldn’t ask for more, dude.

    EK: What does fighting in the UFC mean to you?

    CM: It’s my career and you’ve got access to a lot of people. You’ve got fans and people that are interested in what you’re doing, too. It means a lot to me; it’s my career and it’s also my job. my job is being of the maximum usefulness to others, and I have to make sure that I come across the right away and make sure that everyone knows me for who I really am. I’m not different than before; I just got done pulling weeds [laughs] and tilling my garden, so I’m not different. I called the guy about fixing a window, he’s going to come by later on—I’m just a normal guy. For right now, the most important thing is this interview and clearly conveying my message.

    EK: Is it ever difficult to stay on this path?

    CM: It is, man; it’s a struggle every day. First, I’ve got to stay sober. If I can do that, though, everything will be okay. As long as I maintain what I’m doing, show up to the gym every day, and take care of my family every day, then everything will be good, man. I have no problems—except it’s pouring rain right now [laughs].

    EK: Where does fighting rank on your list of priorities?

    Number-three. Number-one is carrying the message, man. Number-two is making sure that I take care of my family, so number-three is the competition; trying to figure out how to beat my next opponent. I’m fighting September 17th against Dong Yi Yang in the “Battle of the Bayou.” UFC Fight Night 25; that’s my next challenge. I’ve got to show up and compete as well as I can compete, but I have to make sure that I show up tonight at practise to make sure that I get there. I can’t look to far ahead into the future; I try to stay focused, one foot after the other, you know? I try to not look too far into the future.

    EK: Realistically, did you ever think that you would have so many people looking up to you?

    CM: No, man. I had no idea—no idea. It’s amazing, though, man. I have an amazing life; I’ve got a great wife, two beautiful sons, I have an awesome mother and father, I couldn’t ask for a better brother, and the friends and people that I have around me—including the fans—I couldn’t be more grateful. I couldn’t be more grateful.


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    23 Aug 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Jan Jorgensen’s blood work is back.

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    As many of you know Jan failed his wiz quiz and claimed his innocence since the beginning. I don’t know much about drugs and if you can really get a “false positive” from eating a poppy seed muffin, so i looked into it. According to www.erowid.org, “Poppy seeds contain both Morphine and Codeine and can cause false positives for Opiates in urine tests. Most Opiate urine tests have a cut off level of 300 ng/ml. Ingestion of a single poppy seed bagel can produce an opiate level somewhere around 250 ng/ml three hours later. 3 teaspoons of store bought poppy seeds can result in 1200 ng/ml 6 hours later (1). We have read an estimate that 70% of DOT opiate positives are from poppy seeds. The U.S. Military uses cut off levels of 3000 ng/ml in order to minimize false positives.” With this information, Jan’s NEGATIVE blood work test coming back and Jan’s actions all lead me to believe that he is indeed innocent.


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    23 Aug 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Jan Jorgenson’s blood work is back.

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    As many of you know Jan failed his wiz quiz and claimed his innocence since the beginning. I don’t know much about drugs and if you can really get a “false positive” from eating a poppy seed muffin, so i looked into it. According to www.erowid.org, “Poppy seeds contain both Morphine and Codeine and can cause false positives for Opiates in urine tests. Most Opiate urine tests have a cut off level of 300 ng/ml. Ingestion of a single poppy seed bagel can produce an opiate level somewhere around 250 ng/ml three hours later. 3 teaspoons of store bought poppy seeds can result in 1200 ng/ml 6 hours later (1). We have read an estimate that 70% of DOT opiate positives are from poppy seeds. The U.S. Military uses cut off levels of 3000 ng/ml in order to minimize false positives.” With this information, Jan’s NEGATIVE blood work test coming back and Jan’s actions all lead me to believe that he is indeed


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    22 Aug 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Gi Review: Black Eagle Raptor Part 1 – The Interview

    This Article comes from Arcanum Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Blog


    I know that Arcanum is starting to feel like a review blog, but it’s not. It’s a BJJ blog. It’s just that lately I’ve had a rash of gis to review and very little time to get it all done. The blog will feature more and more training material over the next months.

    In the mean time, the next gi review is one I’ve been looking forward to for quite some time. Get ready to meet the Black Eagle Raptor; the first luxury gi I’ve ever rolled in. The Raptor is so comfortable it induces a feeling of guilt; almost like I’m cheating on my other gis when I wear it. Not to say that it’s perfect; I found some definite issues with this pre-production model that I hope will get serious attention for the official launch (comfort was not the issue, by the way). But more on that later.

    Now it’s time to hear what Steve from Black Eagle has to say about the Raptor:

    ArcanumBJJ

    What was your goal in building the Raptor?


    Black Eagle

    We wanted to show that we could also build a Kimono that stood out, but the difference being we were not prepared to let people order something without first getting samples and having those tested thoroughly.


    ABJJ

    What made you guys decide to try your hand at a “luxury” kimono?


    B.E.

    Our ‘forte’ has always been durable, lightweight BJJ Kimonos of a high quality. The Raptor was a project to show that we could also produce a ‘luxury’ Kimono to a high standard, but at a price people could afford.


    ABJJ

    How does adding built-in rashguard lining complicate the manufacturing process?


    B.E.

    The rash guard has to be made and printed and then stitched into the jacket at the pattern stage, so getting the print lined up is the hard part. But, yes, it adds cost due to the additional procedures required to ensure a good fit.


    ABJJ

    What sort of testing does a new gi model go through?


    (…)
    Finish reading Gi Review: Black Eagle Raptor Part 1 – The Interview.


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    22 Aug 2011

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Steven Siler UFC Bound?

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    It looks as thought another local is getting his shot in the big show!Congrats to Steven Siler for making on the 14th season of, “The Ultimate Fighter.” The reality show, which is the final season to air on Spike TV before a move to FX, is the first to feature bantamweight (135-pound) and featherweight (145-pound) fighters. So this should be an exciting cast…with fighters that are UFC caliber, but just haven’t had the chance to show it to the world.


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