Archive for January, 2013

25 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • SteelFist Kausing Kaos

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    Hey guys! It’s Dutch bringing you the play by play and as always our sponsor for this event is…no one! We’re looking for a sponsor! So stay tuned for 13 fights and hopefully some great action! Got here a little late so bear with me while I get the pkay by play set up!


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    14 Jan 2013

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  • Horn’s Elite Fight Night

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    Hey FightingOutOf.net fans, sorry for the delay in the Horns Elite Fight Night results. I was unable to get to a computer until now. If you missed Jeremy Horn’s show…you missed out on a night if great fights. It’s always interesting to see how these armatures do in their first fights. So without further a due…

    Amateur Fights

    Chris Russell def Matt Nestico via Unanimous Decision

    Scott Foster def John Atchison via 1st rd Armbar

    Brandon Hogan def Brian Smith via 1st rd tap to strikes

    Jermaine Tisi def Mitch Thompson via Unanimous Decision

    Sean Pickett def Trevor Atchison via 1st rd Guillotine Choke

    Pro Fights

    Eduardo Rivera def Shaughn Hull via 1st rd K.O

    David Allred def Ray Davis via 1st rd Triangle Choke


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    11 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Are you losing because of the Rules or your skill?

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Grappling – Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    At competitions often see situations where athletes blame the rules for their
    lack of skill. They complain that the grappling organization puts too much
    emphasis on takedowns or that the rules only give points for a clean sweep.
    There are many athletes that downplay various grappling organizations because of
    nitpicky details such as these. They pretend that because the rules or referees
    aren’t in their favor that somehow the organization must be the one at fault and
    that their personal grappling game is much better than what the rules allow.

    To me this is absolutely insane. I cannot think of a single organization that
    doesn’t have at least some slight variation in how and why they award points.
    However I cannot think of a single athlete that would not improve by competing
    in all of the various organizations that promote grappling events. 

    The very essence of competition is to challenge your current ability against
    that of another athlete of equal or greater skill to determine your current
    quality. It is the real time problem solving that must take place in the face of
    opposition, regulations and adversity that is the test of character, skill and
    physicality of the athlete. Understanding this is an integral part of becoming a
    better competitor. 

    Today’s grappling athletes live in a unique time where there are multiple
    world level organizations that promote several events throughout each calendar
    year. There are amazing opportunities to grapple here in the US and also
    overseas. I encourage you to take advantage of as many different flavors of
    grappling as you can. 

    I often think of the Machado brothers, early pioneers of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu,
    and how they competed in as many varied types of grappling styles as they could.
    In their formative competitive years they didn’t have the luxury of choosing
    from hundreds of different competitions in gi and no gi every year. They didn’t
    have the ease of online searching for tournaments. They competed in everything
    they could enter; wrestling, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Judo, Sambo and Eskrima just
    to name the ones I’m familiar with. 

    This type of willingness to explore and adapt their grappling abilities and
    applications helped the Machados become not only the best in Jiu Jitsu and
    Grappling but the best in the world as martial artists. They came to understand
    more applications for their art and developed it in a way that others could not
    match. If you are unwilling to lose they you will never have the same level of
    richness to your art as someone that is willing to take the risk.

    If you haven’t competed take the plunge and start competing. If you are a
    competitor be bold and try out a new grappling organization that you may have
    previously neglected. Try training and competing in a completely different
    grappling style than you are used to. 

    Do not let how the rules are regulated and the officiating dictate your
    development as an athlete. Learn to work within the rules and use your skills to
    their greatest advantage. Be an explorer. Be a pioneer. Be willing to make big
    strides in your journey of grappling.


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    11 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Are you losing because or the Rules or your skill?

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Grappling – Blog
    To see the full original article click here


     At competitions often see situations where athletes blame the rules for their
    lack of skill. They complain that the grappling organization puts too much
    emphasis on takedowns or that the rules only give points for a clean sweep.
    There are many athletes that downplay various grappling organizations because of
    nitpicky details such as these. They pretend that because the rules or referees
    aren’t in their favor that somehow the organization must be the one at fault and
    that their personal grappling game is much better than what the rules allow.

     To me this is absolutely insane. I cannot think of a single organization that
    doesn’t have at least some slight variation in how and why they award points.
    However I cannot think of a single athlete that would not improve by competing
    in all of the various organizations that promote grappling events. 

    The very essence of competition is to challenge your current ability against
    that of another athlete of equal or greater skill to determine your current
    quality. It is the real time problem solving that must take place in the face of
    opposition, regulations and adversity that is the test of character, skill and
    physicality of the athlete. Understanding this is an integral part of becoming a
    better competitor. 

    Today’s grappling athletes live in a unique time where there are multiple
    world level organizations that promote several events throughout each calendar
    year. There are amazing opportunities to grapple here in the US and also
    overseas. I encourage you to take advantage of as many different flavors of
    grappling as you can. 

    I often think of the Machado brothers, early pioneers of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu,
    and how they competed in as many varied types of grappling styles as they could.
    In their formative competitive years they didn’t have the luxury of choosing
    from hundreds of different competitions in gi and no gi every year. They didn’t
    have the ease of online searching for tournaments. They competed in everything
    they could enter; wrestling, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Judo, Sambo and Eskrima just
    to name the ones I’m familiar with. 

    This type of willingness to explore and adapt their grappling abilities and
    applications helped the Machados become not only the best in Jiu Jitsu and
    Grappling but the best in the world as martial artists. They came to understand
    more applications for their art and developed it in a way that others could not
    match. If you are unwilling to lose they you will never have the same level of
    richness to your art as someone that is willing to take the risk.

    If you haven’t competed take the plunge and start competing. If you are a
    competitor be bold and try out a new grappling organization that you may have
    previously neglected. Try training and competing in a completely different
    grappling style than you are used to. 

    Do not let how the rules are regulated and the officiating dictate your
    development as an athlete. Learn to work within the rules and use your skills to
    their greatest advantage. Be an explorer. Be a pioneer. Be willing to make big
    strides in your journey of grappling.


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    9 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Strategize

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Grappling – Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    Recently I was at one of the local high school wrestling tournaments watching
    some of the athletes in my club. I was pointing out various things to them as we
    watched some of the matches. There was one match in particular that was very
    interesting to me. The two athletes were wrestling for placing at the tournament
    and they were both very skilled. 

    Athlete A was very talented on his feet and scored a beautiful lifting
    takedown and near fall points putting him up 5-0 within the first 30 seconds.
    Athlete B was a very talented mat wrestler and he proceeded to capture the top
    wrestlers arm and leg and Granby roll in order to score a reversal. Athlete A
    had to fight for all he was worth to avoid giving up points on the Granby, his
    arm looked like it was getting pretty tired and he was in danger of going over
    on several occasions. Finally he did get reversed and Athlete B was able to
    control the end of the period on top. The period ended and the referee proceeded
    to the coin flip to determine the starting position of the second period. 

    The coin came up in favor of Athlete A. He deferred his decision until the
    third period so Athlete B was able to make his choice. Athlete B chose the down
    position again and began to work on his Granby roll. The second period was
    basically a replay of the end of the first. Athlete B caused Athlete A major
    fits and created very dangerous situations for Athlete A. Athlete A narrowly
    avoided being reversed multiple times and the score remained unchanged.

    At the start of the third period it was Athlete A’s choice of position. For
    some reason he didn’t know exactly where he wanted to be, a common problem among
    high school athletes, consequently his coaches gave him the most common answer
    that coaches give and told him to choose the bottom position. Their assumption
    was that their athlete would be able to escape and gain a point. 

    I quickly pointed out some very important information to my own athletes as
    this was a very opportune moment to learn something that most people clearly
    overlook. It was simply using solid strategy which Athlete A and his coaches
    seemed to know very little about. 

    Now you may be asking yourself what’s wrong with choosing down? He got a
    takedown easy enough he should be able to escape and do it again.

     I reminded my guys that Athlete A had scored 5 relatively easy points from
    the standing position and that he had to fight his butt off the rest of the
    first round and all of the second as soon as they got on the mat. Athlete B was
    crafty on top and all signs pointed to him being a good pinner if he got the
    opportunity. I pointed out that Athlete A was giving up his best option in place
    of one that was potentially dangerous to him. 

    For the 1 point that he and his coaches hoped to gain they overlooked that he
    would now be giving his opponent the opportunity to score from the top position.
    With only two minutes left Athlete A was leaving himself open to a huge upset if
    he made any mistakes. 

    Athlete B didn’t disappoint in his ability to give Athlete A’s coaches a
    coronary attack. Athlete A was immediately put into a leg ride, flattened out
    and cranked on for the next minute and a half. He was only lucky in that Athlete
    B couldn’t quite seal the deal with his turns. Athlete A by sheer force of will
    and strength managed to get away with very short time remaining and then added
    one last easy takedown to win the match by a large margin of 7-2 that belied the
    actual closeness of the contest. 

    I told my athletes that rather than always taking the common path they must
    pay attention to the match itself. They have to be in tune with their opponent’s
    strengths and weaknesses. 

    If Athlete A would have thought it through for even a few seconds he could
    have chosen neutral rather than deferring until the later round. He could have
    scored another takedown to back-points combo and put the match completely out of
    reach if not winning it outright by a pin. 

    Instead he made choices that would most surely have gotten him beaten if his
    opponent were even 10% stronger. Much of what saved Athlete A from going over on
    several occasions was his physical strength. At any point in the first and
    second periods he could have let go and just given Athlete B the escape and
    started working his takedowns, the ‘Catch and Release’ game of takedown and let
    go to avoid tough mat wrestling situations. All 7 of his points came via the
    takedown. This would have been his best option. 

    We had a discussion of the why’s and why not’s related to this match and I
    could tell what I had just shared was a new concept to these young athletes. It
    started them on a new path and I could tell that their minds were contemplating
    the new found power in this ability to strategize. I could tell that they were
    ready to start thinking and acting in a new and more productive way on the mat. 
     
    Your toughest opponent may not necessarily be your opponent. It might be the
    way you’re approaching you opponent. Your real problem might not be the problem
    at all, maybe it’s the way you’re trying to solve it. 

    Whether you’re on the mat or you’re grappling with a day to day situation
    take a moment and take a look at “where your points are coming from”. Determine
    what your opponent’s strengths and weaknesses are. Most importantly determine
    what your own strengths and weaknesses are. Take a look at how you can leverage
    your abilities to succeed. 

    If you start doing this your ability to strategize will increase and you will
    begin to see new and better solutions for your situation. You will begin to find
    ways to succeed where before you had none. The ability to strategize and develop
    solutions will become a great asset and it will help you on to the ultimate
    successes that you are looking for in life.



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    9 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • HONOR: Seppuku and the Samurai (witness accounts)

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


      Seppuku (maybe you’ve heard of its other form, Harai-kiri) is something you’ll probably never see. You’ve also probably heard that it was a Samurai’s way of “dying with honor” – that way being to die by stabbing himself in the abdomen…that’s kind of true: Seppuku wasn’t just stabbing yourself in the sweet abs and … Continue reading »


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    8 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Competition Training

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Grappling – Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    For me getting ready for a competition is always more motivating and
    stimulating than just training for training’s sake. I like to have goals and
    something to shoot for. I always like the test and thrill of combat and the
    opportunity to test myself to find out where my skills are at and what I do
    well and what needs work.
     
    In order to be fully prepared for competition you will need to
    develop a ‘base’ level of: skill, strength, conditioning, and mental
    preparation. This should be an ongoing process that includes a regular strength
    and conditioning program, grappling classes and private lessons, strategy and
    game plan development and adversity training. To be truly competitive this
    process should be year round.
     
    When training for a specific competition your training needs to
    be similar to what your competition will be like. More emphasis should be placed
    on situational drilling, live sparring and conditioning. A moderate to shorter
    duration grappling workout with a higher output of intensity is best. 
     
    This type of grappling workout should be planned for the last 4-6
    weeks before your competition. Usually about an hour and a half is good to shoot
    for. 2 hours can be a little long and sometimes leads to less effective use of
    time. Make sure that everything you have planned for your grappling session has
    a purpose.
     
    Including actual “Live” matches where time and score is kept help
    add with the preparation. When possible, schedule “Live” training matches so an
    “audience” can be present. Invite friends or family or even have fellow students
    be part of the “crowd” and simulate a real tournament environment. 
      
    The week of the competition plan short, low intensity workouts so
    that you can maximize recovery and take full effect of your body’s adaptive
    capabilities. You should also plan in a day (or two) of full rest during that
    week. I usually try to rest up the day before I travel because I know that
    traveling will take a toll with additional stress of flying or driving,
    unfamiliarity with the environment and/or foods and other possible disruptions. 
      
    When I get to my destination I like to have a short intense
    workout to help me get the ‘gunk’ of travel out of my system and settle in
    mentally. I have found this is very beneficial over the years of competition
    experience. It is also relaxing because your body has a chance to release some
    of the nervous tension that comes up prior to competition.


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    1 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Total Mayhem New Years Eve Show!

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    Hey fight fans! Sorry we weren’t able to bring you the action blow by blow. So here is the next best thing, the results! Happy New Year and be safe!

    AJ Garcia def Kaliko Sotelo via RNC 1st rd.


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    1 Jan 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Advice From The Best Samurai Ever

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    Miyamoto Musashi is widely regarded as the best Samurai that has ever lived.   Not including any wars, he is believed to be undefeated in challenges from other Japanese masters and swordsmen in over 60 duels.  In case you’re a little lost, that’s what happened once rifles were introduced, swordsmen walked around keeping the sword-play alive for honor by … Continue reading »


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