Archive for May, 2013

27 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Do Your Hands Hang Low? Colton Smith vs Robert Whittaker

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


     

    A lot of guys have a problem not keeping it up, but only a few do it on purpose.

    Robert Whittaker, under direction from brilliant coach Firas Zahabi, employed the gambit successfully against Colton Smith: right hand glued to the jaw, left hand on the thigh. In the post fight interviews, Whittaker said himself that it was a specific tactic to this fight and basically “suicide” against real striker.  Against a fairly one-dimensional wrestler, it shut down most of the incoming takedown attempts with only minor setbacks in the striking department.

    I find the whole thing fairly intriguing, including Whittaker’s three comments about it.

    1. Right-hand counters (Overhand Right/Straight Right)

    2. Automatic underhook for single/double leg takedown

    3. Distraction/split visual focus

     

    I think its clever and agree that a natural striker would be able to take advantage of it.  The low lead hand is seen in boxing, mostly with defensive counter punchers and displayed directly via a guard stance called the philly shell or crab.  It’s a different animal and “version” used by Whittaker is a less sound defense in MMA.

     

    In boxing

    You can see example of it from James Toney and Floyd Maywhether, both using the real deal pretty successfully.

     

     

     

    One especially salient weakness of this stance is that any boxer assuming this pose is vulnerable to an opponent with a quick and powerful jab. When confronted with such a punch directed at his head or upper torso, the boxer assuming this defensive posture will be forced to bend awkwardly away from the punch whilst his feet remain largely stationary. This is because the relatively low position of the defence will mean that the boxer will not be able catch the shot on his gloves or move away on foot, because the punch is too fast, and will not be able to allow the punch to strike him, because the punch is too powerful. This awkward bending back motion will then leave the philly-shell-style fighter vulnerable to a follow-up attack, as the boxer will have elongated, and therefore exposed his lower torso, and because the boxer will – until he straightens his posture – be temporarily fixed to the canvass or reduced to performing small jumps backwards. This awkward position will then make the fighter extremely vulnerable to body shots, as his opponent can move into the pocket directly after opening him up with a jab, and deliver punches to the boxers midsection.

     

    First of all, you have to learn the basic textbook stuff. When you know that, you can start to develop your “own” style, but you have to have the basic to go back to just in case.
    To have your guard low depends on a lot of stuff, yes, you do move better if your jabarm are a little bit lower, but your right hand (orthodox) need to stay up with your chin all the time.
    in my book this is some of the things you need to use a low guard.
    1. hyper reflexes
    2. Good widevision
    3. a lot of headmovement
    4. great footwork
    5. SPEED
    6. Great defensive skills with one hand.
    Also a thing to remember it depends on who you fight. Always come out with a good defense if you see that your oponent are slow you can change after a while and box how ever you want but the closer you get to the oponent the higher your hands should go. Even Ali and Roy Jones and Sugar Ray Leonard has a high guard coming in close.
    Otherwise I love fighting with my jabarm a little low.
    The Predator


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    27 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Do Your Hands Hang Low? Colton Smith vs Robbert Whittaker

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


     

     

     

    UFC 160, what a great night of fights. One intriging bout was Smith vs Whittaker where the latter kept his left hand low the entire fight.

    All part of a strategy.

    1. Overhand Right (says Whittaker)

    2. Straight Right (Says Joe Rogan)

    3. Automatic underhook for single/double leg takedown

     

     

    4. A good distraction/split visual focus

     

    One especially salient weakness of this stance is that any boxer assuming this pose is vulnerable to an opponent with a quick and powerful jab. When confronted with such a punch directed at his head or upper torso, the boxer assuming this defensive posture will be forced to bend awkwardly away from the punch whilst his feet remain largely stationary. This is because the relatively low position of the defence will mean that the boxer will not be able catch the shot on his gloves or move away on foot, because the punch is too fast, and will not be able to allow the punch to strike him, because the punch is too powerful. This awkward bending back motion will then leave the philly-shell-style fighter vulnerable to a follow-up attack, as the boxer will have elongated, and therefore exposed his lower torso, and because the boxer will – until he straightens his posture – be temporarily fixed to the canvass or reduced to performing small jumps backwards. This awkward position will then make the fighter extremely vulnerable to body shots, as his opponent can move into the pocket directly after opening him up with a jab, and deliver punches to the boxers midsection.

     

    First of all, you have to learn the basic textbook stuff. When you know that, you can start to develop your “own” style, but you have to have the basic to go back to just in case.
    To have your guard low depends on a lot of stuff, yes, you do move better if your jabarm are a little bit lower, but your right hand (orthodox) need to stay up with your chin all the time.
    in my book this is some of the things you need to use a low guard.
    1. hyper reflexes
    2. Good widevision
    3. a lot of headmovement
    4. great footwork
    5. SPEED
    6. Great defensive skills with one hand.
    Also a thing to remember it depends on who you fight. Always come out with a good defense if you see that your oponent are slow you can change after a while and box how ever you want but the closer you get to the oponent the higher your hands should go. Even Ali and Roy Jones and Sugar Ray Leonard has a high guard coming in close.
    Otherwise I love fighting with my jabarm a little low.
    The Predator


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    27 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • 3 Very Awesome (and famous) Jiu Jitsu Matches

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    If you go to youtube and type in “awesome jiu jitsu match”, you’re going to find a lot of good ones and a lot of backyard matches that are horrible.  … Continue reading


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    22 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Tap Semi-Early and Extremely Often

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    You’ve heard it thousands upon millions of times, “tap early, tap often”, but how much of that goes into one ear and right out the other?  How many times do … Continue reading


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    18 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Analysis of MMA Salaries and Organizational Revenues

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


     

    Yep, that’s the title of my master’s project, which I have recently defended (successfully).  I’ll spare you 40 pages and give you the quick and dirty.

    1.  MMA salaries are efficient,  meaning that the more you pay out in salary per fight card, the more revenue you are likely to make.  This is a no-brainer that I’ve proved with the data;  the higher quality fighters get (demand?) higher salaries and consumers pay more for higher quality.

    2. If a fighter gets  ~200k show and 0 to win, that fighter is likely getting a cut of PPV.

    3. The system of PPV revenue sharing works;  giving guys a cut of PPV sales drives up PPV buys.

    4.  The art of matchmaking matters.  From a salary perspective, you’d think that compelling match-ups would consist of taking the top quality (paid) guys and matching them up against each other.  However, there is no “balanced ticket effect” – salary fairness/equality between fighters doesn’t boost PPV sales or Live Gate numbers (attendance).  Fans may bemoan Joe Silva’s match making, claiming XYZ fighter needs to fight ABC fighter, but from a revenue standpoint, they are doing things right: the UFC is making money.

    5. MMA fighters are underpaid, and I can prove it.  (Monopoly/Monopsony market effects on salary, inter-sport comparisons, etc)

     

    There is a lot I still don’t know, and plenty more research to be done. However, I’m happy to field questions about any of these points or various MMA salary issues in general. I’d love to hear your thoughts and theories of MMA salary too!


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    16 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Crash Pad

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Grappling – Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    I recently ordered a crash pad from www.floorandmatstore.com it just arrived today and I am so excited to get my guys throwing on it! It is a 4′ x 4″ x 6′ crash pad and feels really good. My little kddos and I tried it out at home and I’m excited to get my big boys working some throws on it. Ever since I started wrestling over 20 years ago throwing people has always brought me a lot of enjoyment. I will keep you posted with updates on the proceedings at our workouts.

    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    13 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • The smile of a child

    This Article comes from Utah Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    In this day and age, where it seems like kids feel so entitled, it is easy to overlooked the fact that this doesn’t necessarily translate into actual self-esteem.

    I have a son who is ten years old.  Like many 10 year olds, it’s a struggle to get him to do much of anything that doesn’t involved a mouse or a game controller.

    After various stints of Judo attendance over the years, we just recently got him going again.  I have been hoping, that as he nears his 11th birthday, that some of the testosterone will kick in a bit more, and the draw of Judo and Jiu Jitsu will as well.

    He did pretty well in class.  As we walked out to the car though, Sensei followed us out.  Mike walked out to the car, and leaned down to my son.  He told him how impressed he was with his efforts, and how well he was doing.  He told my son that he would like to take him and a few of the other boys over the next few weeks, and have them work on some specific moves in order to prepare to test for the next belt.

    My son was thunderstruck.  He looked in shock, and said one of the most heartfelt “thank you”‘s I’ve ever heard.

    As we drove away, he informed me that he was actually proud of himself.

    It may sound like a small thing to you, but I cannot tell you how much it meant to me to hear those words from my son.  to see him really happy with himself.

    He sang along to the radio all the way home.  So did I.

    Thank Sensi Mike Hermosillo for all that you do.


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    10 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Why The IOC Should Be The Real Concern

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Grappling – Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    Why The IOC Should Be The Real Concern

    With all the recent hubbub about wrestling being taken out of the Olympics I can’t help but wonder why the IOC itself isn’t the one being under more intense scrutiny and investigation.

    I seem to recall several scandalous reports about the 2002 winter Olympics and all of the reported bribing and back scratching that was a requirement to get the Olympics here to Salt Lake City, Utah. I can only imagine what must take place for the summer Olympics.

    To say that the Olympics is a dirty biz would be like calling the sky blue.

    Yet when it’s all said and done those of us who have (or have had) Olympic aspirations still clamor about the injustice of our sport being booted (or not included).

    When you boil it all down the Olympics has become the epitomy of corporate greed, deception and exploitation. Greed because; why in the hell do the IOC, McDonalds, Powerade, Coca-Cola, Home Depot etc. etc. etc. make millions if not billions in profits during the Olympics but athletes are considered ‘amateur’ status (unless of course they are actually PRO’s competing in high profile/high dollar sports).

    Why do the athletes have to sacrifice their lives, future employment, family, and other relationships all for the sake of participating and a chance at a medal without direct monetary compensation?

    Would Micky-D’s and the usual suspects pony up the advertising dough if they weren’t making serious cha-ching from it? Me thinks not.

    Yet we are all suckers for the “We’re supporting our Olympic athletes” line that’s thrown at us every four years. We go for it hook line and sinker all the while athletes are scraping by and the parents of those  that actually make it to the games put their house up for a second or third mortgage so they can have a chance to watch their kid compete.

    Sounds like the IOC has a really sweet deal going on here, reminds me a lot of sweat shops that pay next to nothing and suck the life blood out of their workers.

    At what point are we going to see through the absolute b.s. that is the IOC? With so much deception why do we still even care about the Olympics at all?

    Because the corporate powers that be are damn good marketers and there is no escaping them. Its why despite emphysema, diabetes and heart attacks people still smoke cigarettes and eat hamburgers.

    We’ve become duped into the buy/sell pattern that the IOC and the corporate powers of the world want us in. We’ve bought into the “Olympic Dream” that in reality isn’t so dreamy.

    As a wrestler I love the Olympics for countless reasons, not the least of which is the power that it has to bring nations together in peace to participate in their chosen sports. I have the utmost respect for the sacrifice and dedication that it takes to work towards a dream as lofty as being an Olympian or Olympic Champion. But I cannot sit idly by and not at least voice my concern over a corrupt organization that so blatantly exploits their main asset; the athletes, regardless of which sport they belong to.

    If it were up to me we would let every damn sport under the sun on God’s green earth participate and they would all get compensated. There would be no more of this under-the-table dealing or profiteering that is the current state of affairs because of the IOC.

    In essence the Olympics would go back to the way they were meant to be; athletes competing to be the best, people pushing the level of their ability in its purest form.

    Share the hell out of this if you agree!


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    9 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • The Dirty Truth about Dave Camarillo’s Book, “Submit Everyone”.

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


     

    It sucked. I was going to review it, but couldn’t help myself from sleuthing into the details. Basically, Dave or Kevin Howell or Tim Ferris (of 4-hour fame) paid for something, very very dirty.

    And by that I mean paying for positive reviews on the book to help it sell.  And not prostitutes.  Although that would be an even spicier story.

    Before I dive right into a rant about how I can nearly 100% prove this allegation, let me say that I think Dave Camarillo is an amazing instructor.  I hope that he had nothing to do with the dubious promotion of a book I think he had actually little to do with in the first place. I give him the benefit of the doubt. I’m not here to bash him, nor the book (seriously).  I have a fascination with publishing, Tim Ferris, and other shenanigans  Basically, I just wanted to look into it.

    So onto the meat.

    The facts:

    As of today, there are 46 reviews for his book:

    40 are five-star

    3 are four-star

    1 is two-star

    2 are one-star.

    32/40 five-star rating are given by reviewers with one one review to their name. Fishy.

    22 of these 32 five-star reviews were submitted on or before the day of the book’s released (Jan 4 2012).  Did these people read the book? Likely not.

    4 additional five-star reviews are highly dubious,with the reviewer’s public history suggesting they are a comment spammers.

    In total 38/40 five-star reviews are probably paid spam.

    The most popular is a 1-star review that 93/101 people “found helpful” – ie, the review the crowd unanimously voted as the best.  The review is pretty scathing and spot on. The second most popular, 19/24 people found useful is another 1-star.

     

    The conjecture

     

    I believe Dave probably was approached by a ghost writer to make this book happen and Dave consented. Then, the book gets pumped up on Amazon with false reviews and a foreword by Mr Ferris. Tim plays an interesting role in the plot;  Tim has been accused cheating the Amazon review system before* (94% likely) and is kinda a weird dude/crazy person who is awesome at promoting stuff.  Why oh why would Tim Ferris lend his largess to a jujitsu book in the first place?  Tim “won” a small kickboxing championship by hacking the system – ensuring he was heavier than his opponents and then pushing them out of bounds, forcing a win via disqualification. A warrior to be feared, no doubt.  Surely this spirit of gamesmanship put some coin into his pocket, and the Submit Everyone book is likely no different.

     

    The Sum Up 

     

    Dave’s book has some redeeming content and I’d probably give it a 2-star rating. See for yourself, buy the book or read the reviews here.

     

    * This is kind off topic, but I could go over all the details of Tim’s marketing success through “cheating”, a point he would likely not deny as he’s all about life hacking. I don’t blame him, but do think its a silly way to live.


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here

    9 May 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Resting Heart Rate: Michael Bisping 34, Dan Hardy 42

    This Article comes from SLC MMA
    To see the full original article click here


    Just found out that two MMA Brits have ridiculously low resting heart rates.

    And of course when I found out, I thought of you.


    To comment on this post, please visit the original article click here