Archive for August, 2013

16 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Background of Chil Sung Hyung

    This Article comes from Wasatch Martial Arts Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    Chil Sung Fan and SincerityThe Chil Sung (七 星) Hyung are the prime picture of the art of Soo Bahk Do™ Moo Duk Kwan™. Created in 1952 by Hwang Kee, Chang Shi Ja (CSJ), Chil Sung Hyung are the hallmark of the art of Soo Bahk Do™. They embody the knowledge Hwang Kee, CSJ acquired from decades of training and study. This essay will discuss the history, meaning, and character of the Chil Sung Hyung.

    To fully understand a hyung, it’s important to understand the history of its founder. This provides context and perspective on the form. We begin to understand its unique “Ryu Pa” as you understand the influences that played a part in its creation.

    Hwang Kee, CSJ’s training comprised of many martial arts throughout the years. He studied in numerous “Neh Ga (內家)” and “Weh Ga (外家)” systems including So Rim Jang Kwon (少林 拳), Tae Kuk Kwan (太極拳), Dham Doi Sip E Ro (潭腿), Tang Soo Do (唐手道)–Kara Te Do–, and Tae Kyun.

    Weh Ga Ryu

    Weh Ga Ryu (Outside House Style) in China is mainly recognized  as So Rim Jang Kwon, more commonly known in English as Shaolin Long Fist. It originated in the Buddhist temple at Shaolin. It’s known for it’s intense “ryun bup”, or conditioning of the body and a focus on strong, powerful hand and foot techniques. The long fist techniques are akin to our Hwa Kuk techniques that are found in many of the Chil Sung Hyung. Many of the same techniques– namely Jang Kap Kwon and Jang Kwon Do–can also be found in Dham Doi Sip E Ro, a foundational set of exercises practiced in many Jang Kwan systems.

    Weh Ga Ryu techniques are characterized as light, quick, and powerful. Other Weh Ga martial arts that influenced Chil Sung include Tang Soo Do (Kara Te Do), where you will find basic techniques such as Ha Dan Mahkee, Choong Dan Kong Kyuk, and Soo Do Kong Kyuk. One example of Tang Soo Do influence is the sequences in Chil Sung Sam Ro where you turn back up the front of the form line and perform Sang Dan Mahkee/Teul Oh Soo Do, Ahp Cha Gi, lunging Kap Kwon in Kyo Cha Rip Jaseh. This sequence can also be found in Pyong Ahn Sa Dan, which was influenced by Kong Sang Koon. These are both Tang Soo Do hyung.

    Neh Ga Ryu

    Conversely, Hwang Kee, CSJ studied a Neh Ga (Inside House) system called Tae Kuk Kwon (Tai Chi Chuan) that was created by Chinese nationals and centered around the tenants of Daoism, a religion founded in China by No Ja (Lao Tzu). Not only was it a practical martial art, but also focused on Daoyin(導引), or Daoist calisthenics. These were used for self cultivation and included exercises such as Ba Duan Jin (八段錦), or Moo Pahl Dan Kuhm in Korean, and Yi Jin Jing (易筋经), or Yuk Keun Kyung in Korean. Specific daoyin techniques can be found in some of the Chil Sung Hyung. Chil Sung Sa Ro for example, has the same posture as Moo Pahl Dan Kuhm #4.

    Within the Chil Sung Hyung, you will find many techniques influenced by Tae Kuk Kwon as well.  The preparation of the first technique of Chil Sung Il Ro is also the initial movement of Tae Kuk Kwon Hyung, called Pong (掤) or Ward Off. Other obvious Tae Kuk Kwon postures found in Chil Sung Hyung include Press (擠) and Push (按). I imagine after further study, other postures will be more apparent in the Chil Sung Hyung.

     Birth of Choong Ga Ryu

    When Hwang Kee, CSJ was translating portions of the Kwon Bup section of the Moo Yei Do Bo Tong Ji, he quoted a section comparing Neh Ga Ryu to Weh Ga Ryu. Within the following quote, it’s important to note that Chang Sam Bong (张三丰) is the founder of Tae Kuk Kwon. I have inserted some clarifying text in square brackets to better understand the passage:

    “After Chang Sam Bong mastered So Rim Bup [Shaolin Long Fist Style], he founded the Nai Ka [Neh Ga] system. If one can master a few Nai Ka [Neh Ga] techniques he will be victorious over the So Rim practitioner.

    It is stated earlier in this text that Nai Ka is more effective than Oi Ka (Weh Ga). The author [Hwang Kee, CSJ] translated these statements from the original text without any alterations. However, he does not necessarily agree with the assertion that Nai Ka can be the conqueror of So Rim after obtaining a few techniques. For practical purposes, we should not neglect the So Rim techniques.”

    Here it is apparent that Hwang Kee, CSJ saw value in both Neh Ga Ryu and Weh Ga Ryu, and thus created a new system called Choong Ga (中 家), or Middle House. The Chil Sung Hyung have characteristics of both Neh Ga and Weh Ga. Some techniques are light, fast, and powerful, where others focus more on breath, energy, heaviness, and Sun Sok Mi (line, speed, beauty) and we transition from one to the other with ease.

    Having both elements of Neh Ga and Weh Ga, the Chil Sung forms are truly representative of Hwang Kee, CSJ’s Choong Ga Ryu, leveraging the advantages of both philosophies of thought. Within the Chil Sung Hyung, however, you will find some techniques that neither fit the traditional mold of Neh Ga or Weh Ga. These are uniquely Soo Bahk and come directly from the Kwon Bup section of the Moo Yei Do Bo Tong Ji (武藝圖譜通志). The Moo Yei Do Bo Tong Ji was a war book on enemy war tactics, written by Park Je Ga and Lee Duk Mu during the reign of King Jong Jo,  that included the sword, spear, staff, and even open hand called Kwon Bup (拳法), or Fist Method. Inside it explained an ancient martial art system called Soo Bahk (手搏). The book had a diagram of a two-person form and had pages of text explaining various training methods and postures such as Yuk Ro and Ship Dan Kuhm.

    Some of these training methods and postures can be found in Chil Sung Hyung such as Ta Ko Shik (beating drum method), Po Wol Seh (Embrace the Moon Posture), etc. These are most closely aligned with the ancient art of Soo Bahk, retransformed after having been lost in time.

    A Guide for the Art

    From the complexity of the Chil Sung Hyung, it is apparent that the Chil Sung Hyung series is a compilation of Hwang Kee, CSJ’s knowledge throughout his life and a guide to understand his intentions for the art, combining the best practices of both Neh Ga Ryu and Weh Ga Ryu into his unique Choong Ga style. This line of thinking is further substantiated by understanding the name itself. Chil Sung means 7 Stars and it is often stated that these 7 Stars reference Ursa Minor, or the Little Dipper. The 7th Star is Polaris, the North Star, which was used as a guide for travelers to find their way. This is used as a metaphor that we can use the Chil Sung forms to guide our training in Soo Bahk Do™ Moo Duk Kwan™. It is through these forms that we can feel the essence of the Art.

    As I practice 6 of the 7 Chil Sung Hyung, a set of themes are apparent that teach fundamental concepts of the Art:

    • Chil Sung Il Ro – This hyung introduces Neh Gong techniques and allows us to focus on connection between your breath and chain of command throughout the technique. Earth Energy (Ji Ki) is a significant factor in the hyung.
    • Chil Sung E Ro – This hyung is the most basic and closest in style to the traditional hyung of Tang Soo Do. The focus is on balance and Ki Seh, or poise.
    • Chil Sung Sam Ro – The hyung is very active in nature, similar in energy to Bassai. It is through this hyung that many of the Soo Bahk Ki Cho are practiced such as Do Mal Shik, Ta Ko Shik, and Yo Shik.
    • Chil Sung Sa Ro – This is a physically demanding hyung with a clear emphasis on Shin Chook which translates to Relaxation and Tension but is also closely aligned with expansion and contraction.
    • Chil Sung O Ro – No other hyung allows you to more easily carry the energy from one movement to the next. It is through this hyung that you can learn to keep your arm full of energy (Ki).
    • Chil Sung Yuk Ro – Chil Sung Yuk Ro is by far the most complex of the six. Like Chil Sung O Ro, energy carries from one technique to the next. What I find unique in this hyung is the diversity of movements and a better understanding of space. You will find techniques on the ground, standing, in the air, spinning, and jump spinning.

    Chil Sung Chul Hak

    If we look deeper into the true meaning of Chil Sung, one must understand Korean culture and philosophy. Chil Sung is a well known term and Chil Sung monuments can be seen throughout Korea. Jang, Dae Kyu, Sa Bom Nim taught me on multiple occassions that Chil Sung is used in Korean daily life to understand the balance of nature and to provide physical health and total well-being.

    Chil Sung is a composite of Tae Guk (太極), or Um/Yang, plus O Haeng (五行), or 5 Elements or Energies .  The Um Yang is the red and blue symbol found on the South Korean Korean flag. Oh Haeng represents the 5 elements:  Wood, Metal, Fire, Water, and Earth.  Everything in our world are manifestations of Chil Sung and through careful study, we can find elements of Chil Sung throughout our training and also in our daily life.

    Applying the Weh Gong approach to Chil Sung philosophy will add richness to practicing Chil Sung Hyung. Throughout each hyung, the transitions from Um and Yang techniques are apparent and fulfilling. Chil Sung Il Ro is a prime example of going through slow, internal techniques, to quick and powerful techniques. One example of including O Haeng in your training is to incorporate the Yuk Ja Gyol (六字訣), or 6 Natural Sounds. These sounds will help each technique harness a distinct type of energy and feeling. There are also health benefits correlated to various internal organs as shown below:

    Sound Element/Energy Organ
    Shuuuu Wood Liver
    Haaaa Fire Heart
    Whooo Earth Spleen
    Tsssss Metal Lungs
    Fuuu Water Kidney
    Heeeee Neutral Triple Warmer

    As we delve deeper into Chil Sung Philosophy, we’ll find additional benefits of training Chil Sung Hyung and acquire a more profound understanding of the art of Soo Bahk Do™ Moo Duk Kwan™.

    In my opinion, Hwang Kee, CSJ’s culminating creation within the art of Soo Bahk Do™ is the Chil Sung Hyung. No other set of forms better exemplify all aspects of the art of Soo Bahk Do™ Moo Duk Kwan™. They truly are a guide with deep historical and practical significance.

    *The following article was submitted as a part of my O Dan Shim Sa for the Euro Soo Bahk Do Moo Duk Kwan™ Technical Advisory Committee. All of information provided here is based on my own personal research and may not align with the official teachings of the US Soo Bahk Do Moo Duk Kwan™ Federation.

    References

    Hwang, Kee, History of the Moo Duk Kwan, 1995, p. 14
    Tang Soo Do (唐手道) is a generic term that means “Way of the China Hand”. Pronounced “Kara Te” in Japanese, this was a term that the Korean people recognized in the early and mid 20th Century. Tang Soo Do today is known across the world as a generic term for those who have a historical connection to Hwang Kee, Chang Shi Ja. In this paper, I use the term Tang Soo Do in its original context, of Japanese Karate that came from the Ryukyu Island of Okinawa, which in turn came from China during the “Tang” Dynasty.
    Shahar, Meir, The Shaolin Monastery, 2008, p. 137-138
    Hwang, Kee, Tang Soo Do (Soo Bahk Do), 1992, p. 85
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liu_Zi_Jue

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    11 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Splits Are Necessary For Anything You Do (according to Van-Damme)

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    I grew up in the 80′s.  That being said, it’s safe to assume that I am of the strictest belief that throwing stars can stop a horde of ninjas, smoke-bombs will make you disappear, and fighting consists of throwing 15 punches


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    11 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Splits Are Necessary For Anything You Do (according to Van-Damme)

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    I grew up in the 80′s.  That being said, it’s safe to assume that I am of the strictest belief that throwing stars can stop a horde of ninjas, smoke-bombs will make you disappear, and fighting consists of throwing 15 punches


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    10 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Jeremy Horn’s Elite Fight Night 19 Results and play by play

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    Alexander Johnson Vs. Hector Arenas. This is a Kickboxing match at 195

    Round 1

    Alex used good leg kicks to keep his opponent at distance that led to good set ups for his hands. Hector was able to take it for the first round but is already showing some wear.

    Round 2

    Alex noticed a large welt across hectors stomach early in the round and decided it was a target. He’s unrelenting in his attack and hector isn’t doing much to fight back or  defend himself. It looked like alex had the fight, but hector survives another round.

    Round 3

    Alex has amazing combos out of the gate. The ref has separated the fighters and called a time out. Good uppercuts to the body and alex continues to take him apart. Hector has done most of his work with his back against the cage.

    This was an exhibition match so there is no official winner

     

    Zac Kulland Vs. Dakota Groth at 185

    Round 1

    Dakota quickly takes zac down into full guard and it appears zac doesn’t mind throwing from his back. Zac shrimps to the edge of the cage and attempts to escape, but gives Dakota his back in the process. Dakota is going for an arm, but needs better position to get it.

    Round2

    Zac is throwing a lot of shots, but there’s not much power behind them. Dakota shoots and gets stuffed and zac gets his back quickly going for a rear naked. Dakota defends, but zac readjusts and makes Dakota tap.

     

     

    Chance Robbins Vs. Josh Clegg at catch weight 140

    Round 1

    Chance comes forward and goes for a takedown and gets stuffed then comes out with a beautiful tackle. Josh  attempts and gogoplata from the bottom  but chance defends. Josh tries for a triangle and after a bit sinks him. Chance taps in the first round at 2:20

     

     

    Jake daniels Vs. Joel Haro at 135

    Round 1

    Joel is swinging big and opens up for a big takedown into sidemount. Joel panics and gives jake his back. Joel rolls out and they’re on their feet. Jake catches him big and takes him to the ground again in joels gaurd. Lots of ground and pound from jake. Advances to side mount. Jake almost gets a darce choke, but decides to try for full mount with too little time on the clock.

    Round 2

    Jake drags him down with a single leg.  Joel throws up a triangle and jake taps.

     

     

    Joes Salguero Vs. Lorenzo Mirand at 155

     

    .Round 1

    Lorenzo looks like he’s a weight class above Jose.

    They feel eachother out for a bit and lorenzo comes out with some big bombs. They feel eachother again and it’s almost an instant replay. Jose looks a bit worried and isn’t willing to comit. Jose attempts several takedowns but doesn’t get any of them.

    Round 2

    Lorenzo attacks and jose answers with a nice overhand right. Lots of dirty boxing in this round and Lorenzo is bleeding from his nose and a cut on his cheek. Jose is using kicks to keep the distance.

    Round 3

    Jose is throwing some big shots and takes Lorenzo down grabbing his back and quickly taking the rear naked choke. Lorenzo taps at :35

    Raleigh Roberts Vs. Ryan Lund at catch 170

    Round 1

    Ryan takes him down into guard he has him tight in the corner. Raleigh is just looking for a way out. Ryan goes for an arm and pays for it with a huge slam.

    Round 2

    Ryan goes for the slam again but Raleigh grabs hold of th cage and softens the blow. We’re back in the same position we spent most of round one in. Raleigh trys to push ryan off but ryan jumps back down into side mount. Raleigh gets back to full guard. Raleigh finally gets into a good position after finding an unsecured arm but has no energy left.

    Round 3

    Both fighters look exhausted. Ryan slams him to the matt and quickly gets a shoulder choke.

     

     

    Kani Correa Vs. Philip Gephardt at 175

    Round 1

    Phillip take him down and holds him in the corner of the cage. Phil moves to side mount and puts some knees into kani’s side. Kani gets full guard, phil spins out to side control again. They move to north south and stand up. Phil keeps tring for the take down and kani pulls him under. Phil attempts a banana split submission they scramble and phil gets full mount. Kani escapes and they end the round in side mount.

    Round 2

    Kani comes swinging and drives him into the fence. They sink down into north south and phil spins around and takes his back. Phil gets full mount. Phil attempts a twister, the leg slips out and they’re in side mount. Another twister attempt another escape and phil moves into kani’s  half guard.

    Round 3

    Kani comes with a great front kick and overhand right drives for a takedown and gets stuffed. Phil drags him down and gets side control. Phil slips and kani takes the chance forsome huge ground and pound. And somehow survives. The ref splits the fighters. There’s a bit of debate about resetting position. They start in on the ground with kani on top. He’s really doing damage with his ground and pound.  Kani gets full mount just before the bell.

    The judges score it 29-28 phillip Gephardt

    Jordan Marriott Vs. Chris Lee at 145

    Round1

    Jordan catches chris early with an overhand right and knocks him out with several uppercuts  at :23.

     

     

    David Bugara Vs. Pat Reeves at 135

    Round 1

    Dave catches a kick and pulls pat to the ground. He quickly gets to his feet. Dave is really accurate with his striking, but pat is keeping distance with his kicks and continues to move forward. Pat has a cut above his left eye. Dave shoots and takes it to the ground. Dave posts up and delivers some huge ground and pound. Dave lets him up.

    Round 2

    Pat starts to use his legs a bit more in an attempt to combat daves great punching. Dave shoots again and gets the takedown. The ref pauses the fight to put a mouthpiece back in. Pat grabs a leg and goes for a knee pinch and ends the round in dominant position.

    Round 3

    Pat shoots for a take down after a bit of a scramble david stands back up. David takes it down and attempts to post up, but pat holds him in his guard. Dave stands again. Pat has thrown caution to the wind and is throwing for the fences. David takes him down with a double leg and stands up again.  And again. Pat gets in a good knee before he’s taken down again.

    The judges score the fight 30-27 David

     


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    9 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Steelfist "Unstoppable" Results

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    We were unable to have a live play by play from the Steelfist event tonight! We where however able to get results! Sorry to anyone who usually plans on getting fight results from us…we apologize!

    John Simpson def John Atchison TKO rd 1

    Cameron Howell def Shilo Julander TKO rd 2

    Kaecy Raddon def Brandon Royal TKO rd 1

    Daniel Reis def Mark May Armbar rd 1

    Sean Pickett def Alexzander Brown Rear Naked Choke rd 1

    Nathan Harris def Shawn Black TKO rd 2

    Christian Olsen def Kris Messersmith TKO rd 2

    Trevor Bradshaw def Dominic Gero TKO rd 2

    Keven Allred def Joshua Richards Rear Naked Choke rd 1

    Chris Romrell def Riley Earl Doc Stoppage between rd 1 and 2

    Ricky Urias def Lane Roath TKO rd 1

    Randy Yellowhair def Curtis Johnsen Rear Naked Choke rd 1

    Jared Hatch def Mike Crisman TKO rd2

    Jon Neal def Scottie Casey Guillotine rd 1. Congrats to the new Champ!


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    9 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Jeremy Horn’s Elite Fight Night 19 – Live Audio Broadcast

    This Article comes from FightingOutOf.net
    To see the full original article click here


    Head to http://justin.tv/fightingoutof for live audio commentary for Jeremy Horn’s Elite Fight Night 19.


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    4 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Scott Vincent
  • Jiu Jitsu, Mud And Horizons

    Professor Mike Hermosillo once told me that jiu jitsu is weird. It’s weird in the fact that in some ways, it feels like you’re stuck in mud for months or even years. Then, one day, you jump out of the mud and up a level…unfortunately, it’s just a higher level of mud…possibly even more dense.

    What I’m referring to, is the many, MANY plateaus of jitz. I love them. I love training for years and then in one week seemingly shoot up an entire level. I love it because everything works, everything comes together and my confidence skyrockets – all at the same moment. I hate it at the same time because I also feel like my goal is to unleash a roaring river and I just chipped a small stone from the Hoover Dam.

    In case you missed the analogy, here’s another – have you ever been on a road trip that drags on and on? You’re about 20 miles out of town and you yearn to see anything but desert…as you pass over the horizon that you’ve been watching for the last hour or so, you don’t see a city, you see another 50 miles until the next horizon ends. Your trip just got longer and you sink in your seat and just stare and drive…the 20 miles you just recently passed aren’t even on your mind…it’s that next 50 that drains you. That’s what I’m talking about.

    I recently got my feet out of the mud and crossed a horizon. Unfortunately (or fortunately), Professor Hermosillo rolled with me for about 45 minutes the other day and showed me what deep down I already knew – there wasn’t a city as I came around the bend – just another 50 miles.

    I’m writing this as my mat-burns are healing, my neck is cracking and my pinky finger is in a constant state of “bent” – all from my road to the city. It’s my time to stop at the station, refill the tank, and take a little break and deep breath while I stretch my legs.

    Tuesday I get back in my car and start driving. It’s a long road until I see what’s over the next horizon, and again, deep down I know that there isn’t a city, there isn’t a destination – I just keep driving, but I do it for the curiosity of what’s around the next bend.

    Enjoy your trip.

     

    4 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • 9 Laws To Improve Your Jiu Jitsu Game

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    Improving your Jiu jitsu game is a never-ending quest – like trying to find someone who eye fucks me more sexily than Wes Welker.  So, I’m always on the lookout for ways to improve mine.  The Art of War helped me in ways, and because of


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    4 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • 9 Laws To Improve Your Jiu Jitsu Game

    This Article comes from Nuclearchainsaw » Jiu Jitsu and Judo
    To see the full original article click here


    Improving your Jiu jitsu game is a never-ending quest – like trying to find someone who eye fucks me more sexily than Wes Welker.  So, I’m always on the lookout for ways to improve mine.  The Art of War helped me in ways, and because of


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    3 Aug 2013

  • Posted by Utah Martial Arts Feeds
  • Craftsmanship

    This Article comes from Ruiz Combat Grappling – Blog
    To see the full original article click here


    If you want to become great at anything you’ve got to pay attention to detail and you’ve got to give your best effort. I am constantly talking to my club athletes about Craftsmanship in their approach to wrestling.
     
    I encourage my athletes to slow down and get the techniques down correctly before they try to do them too quickly or powerfully. Sometimes a few of them get frustrated as I continually stop them mid technique and have them start from the beginning and do it again correctly. This is something that not all coaches do and it is something that not all athletes appreciate. The ones that come to understand I am trying to help them end up doing better and improve faster. 

    A craftsman takes time and pays attention to little nuances that can make or break their work. As athletes and coaches many times it is easier to do things faster and harder because we get a feeling of accomplishment and
    exhaustion at the end of workouts. While wearing down the body to then let it build back up is part of training it is not and cannot be the only gauge of progress for an athlete, especially within the grappling arts.

    More progress can be made by taking the time to get things right. It may take more time and more mental effort but in the end your technique and body will function at a much higher level. I often say “Slow it down and get it right. You can always add speed and power later.” This philosophy has helped my athletes and I become more technical and have more success in competition. Take a look at your own training and determine how you can become a “craftsman” in your sport. 

    This is what fine craftsmanship looks like at the Armstrong mansion in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. Look at the detail and high level of intricacy on this stair case. This staircase didn’t just appear and it didn’t just become a beautiful detailed staircase by “working harder” or “sucking it up”. 

    Developing this kind of quality takes a tremendous amount of thought, creativity and patience. Carpenters and builders take time to “measure twice and cut once”. Architects draft and redraft until the structure is exactly what they envision it to be in their minds. There were considerations about the structural integrity, the type of materials and the design theme all the way down to the oak leaves and their intricate creation.

    Your approach to sport and your approach to life must be no different. If you want to experience the thrills of winning, travelling and competing on the biggest stages it takes more than just training hard. It takes more than just wishing. 

    Getting to the next level for a high school wrestler usually means competing in college and attaining a scholarship. What better way to pay for schooling than through your athletic effort? This kind of success and opportunity must be thought out like the staircase of a craftsman. I teach my athletes how to look at their athletic career and life in this way because decisions made now by a young athlete can change and improve their life forever. Make the effort to plan your life and your sporting career so that you can someday look back on it all and be proud of the work that you’ve done and what you’ve accomplished.


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